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Horecava 2020 - Success in numbers!

Published: 17 Jan 2020

Horecava 2020 - Success in numbers!

Fresh Pod and Chill Pod enjoyed a productive four days exhibiting on the East of England stand in Amsterdam at the food and drink event - Horecava 2020. Joining 20 local food and drink producers, the group won over hearts and minds of many of the thousands of visitors, all looking for new ideas for their retail shelves and menu's.  
 
Fresh Pod already has an agent in the Netherlands and the Fresh Pod team were joined for part of the event by business partners Willem and John. Reassuring potential customers that any orders placed will be followed through seamlessly from ordering through to delivery. With the Amsterdam fruit, vegetables and flower markets supplying into the UK and Europe and the amount of land allocated to agriculture in the Netherlands, both Chill Pod and Fresh Pod are developing a strong foothold through the Netherlands and into Europe.

Fresh Pod takes on Horecava

Published: 10 Jan 2020

Fresh Pod takes on Horecava

Fresh Pod and Chill Pod exhibiting at Horecava 2020! 
 
Fresh Pod & Chill Pod will be exhibiting for the second year at Horecava 2020. We welcome customers both old and new to join us at any time, on the stand, over the 4 days. 
 
We would like to invite you to join us for the Norfolk and Suffolk drinks reception at the pavilion from 4pm on Tuesday 14th January. 20 local food and drink producers alongside, Fresh Pod and Chill Pod, will be waiting to greet you and there will be a selection of locally produced products for all to enjoy. 
 
What is Horecava? 
 
Horecava is the largest food and drink expo in the Netherlands, offering an innovative and inspiring trade fair attracting over 66,000 catering professionals from 40,000 businesses in the food service industry, covering over 100,000m2 floor space. 
 
The Norfolk and Suffolk pavilion will be showcasing world class food and drink produce from across the region, providing companies from Norfolk and Suffolk with a fantastic opportunity to attend the show and meet with buyers and distributors from across Europe. Fresh Pod and Chill Pod are suppliers to the industry.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.horecava.nl/

Just a note:

Published: 3 Dec 2019

Just a note:

According to The Big Issue, two million turkeys, five million Christmas puddings and over 74 million mince pies are wasted every year at Christmas in the UK. With the estimated number of 270. 000 tonnes of food wasted in the UK each year, half of brits have said that they usually overspend on food at Christmas, but for what?  
 
Fruit bowls brimming with exotic fresh produce and fridges crammed with fruit and vegetables to cater for extra guests, the majority of us cater for more than usual over the festive period. Often the additional purchases end up wasted as they become an unnecessary additional buy. You only have to look at the number of black bags at the end of every street to see just how much waste is created at Christmas. An alternative to throwing away the excess is to pop a Fresh Pod in with the produce to extend their life by up to 4 times longer than normal.  
 
Not only will this exceptional little pod help to reduce the amount of food your household wastes over the Christmas period but it will also decrease the amount of money you spend; £480 per household according to WRAP in 2006! At the low cost of £12.99, a 12-month kit will pay for itself over and over again by extending shelf life of fruit and vegetables for up to four times longer. Fresh Pod is in 1000s of households and after 10 years of saving money for those families its track record is well proven as a natural and safe choice. 
 
Use the pod this Christmas as the perfect stocking filler or even a general gift for friends, family or colleagues. An unusual but useful and exciting gift. Not only are they useful and will last a full year (much longer than many presents received) they will also save the recipient a considerable amount of money by reducing their food waste over the course of 2020.  
 
How Fresh Pod works: 
 
Ethylene gas is given off naturally from fruit, vegetables and flowers as they mature which means that your fruit and vegetables will have a reduced shelf life. Increased wastages adds pressure to household budgets. 
 
Fresh Pod utilises organically approved ethylene absorbing zeolite pellets. A reaction oxidises ethylene gas converting the filter material to manganese dioxide which is an excellent plant fertiliser also approved for organics. Fresh Pod eliminates 98.9% of ethylene gas in a safe and non-toxic way. 
By controlling the levels of ethylene gas in your fridge, fruit bowl or vase of flowers this will extend the shelf life for up to four times longer all of which has financial benefits. 
 
How do I use Fresh Pod? 
 
One individual Fresh Pod sachet is about the size of a teabag and when placed in its pod in the fridge, will ensure that the content stays fresher for longer. Make sure you take them out of their plastic wrappers. Various sizes and packs can be purchased depending on your needs. When the time comes for the sachet to be changed, usually around six months, the contents make a fantastic fertiliser that you can use to feed your house plants. 
 
7 reasons to why you should purchase a Fresh Pod this Christmas: 
 
1. Expands fruit, veg and flowers life expectancy to up to 4 times longer as tested and approved by trading standards. 
2. Saves the average UK house hold £480 per year according to WRAP in 2006. 
3. Completely safe - Fresh Pod absorbs ethylene without unnatural intervention. 
4. Only £12.99 for a 12-month kit (including P&P) or £7.95 for a refill kit (including P&P). 
5. Approved for organics - Fresh Pod neutralises ethylene, airborne fungal spores and bacteria. 
6. Environmentally friendly - Our founding ethos to reduce waste naturally with a 100% recyclable product. 
7. Expired Fresh Pods can be used as a natural fertilizer. Reduce, re-use, recycle. 
 
The Fresh Pod team would like to wish you a very fresh and waste free Christmas. 
 
For further information about Fresh Pod call (01603) 702374.  
 
Keep up to date on relevant news, promotions or sales on our social media accounts both located on Twitter (@FreshPodUk) or Instagram (@freshpod).

Tesco vows to remove one billion pieces of plastic packaging by end of 2020

Published: 1 Nov 2019

Tesco vows to remove one billion pieces of plastic packaging by end of 2020

'Last year Tesco produced 18 billion pieces of plastic, so they've got plenty of work to do but it's a good start', campaigners say. 
 
Britain's biggest retailer Tesco has pledged to remove one billion pieces of plastic from products by the end of 2020 as it seeks to reduce its environmental impact and meet consumer demand for less waste.  
 
The supermarket will end its use of small plastic bags, commonly used to pack loose fruit, vegetables and bakery items, and replace them with paper ones. 
 
It will also remove plastic trays from ready meals, secondary lids on products such as cream and yoghurt, sporks and straws from snack pots and drinks cartons, and 200 million wrappers used to pack clothing and greetings cards. 
 
Where non-recyclable and excess packaging cannot be removed, for example where it prevents food waste, the retailer has pledged to reduce it to an absolute minimum. It is also looking at new ways to reuse its packaging, stating "if packaging can't be recycled, it will have no place at Tesco". 
 
"Last year Tesco produced more than 18 billion pieces of plastic, so they've still got plenty of work to do, but this is a good start and we hope to see further reductions when it introduces its reusable packaging scheme for online orders in the New Year," said Louise Edge, head of Greenpeace UK's ocean plastics campaign 
 
Tesco met 1,500 suppliers in August to let them know that packaging will form a key part of its decision-making process to determine which products it sells, and that it reserved the right to no longer stock items that use excessive or hard-to-recycle materials. 
 
Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis said: "Our work to 'Remove, Reduce, Reuse & Recycle' is already transforming our packaging. Over the next 12 months, we will remove one billion pieces of plastic, further reducing the environmental impact of the products we sell. 
 
"By focusing on solutions that we can apply across all our UK stores and supply chain, we can make a significant difference and achieve real scale in our efforts to tackle plastic." 
 
WWF UK's sustainable materials specialist Paula Chin said: "Plastic pollution is the most visible symptom of the environmental crisis we're currently facing. 
 
"Businesses, governments and households have all got an important part to play, so it's good to see Tesco's commitment to significantly reduce the amount of plastic we use." 
 
Britons have become increasingly aware of the amount of plastic they use following David Attenborough's "Blue Planet II" documentary which highlighted the dangers of plastic pollution to marine life. 
 
In recent years Britain has slashed the use of plastic bags by introducing a 5 pence charge for each one. The government has also considered imposing a "latte levy" on disposable coffee cups which are hard to recycle. 
 
Ms Edge said: "Tesco is absolutely doing the right thing in looking to reduce the number of pieces of plastic packaging it produces. 
 
"When supermarkets focus solely on reducing their packaging by weight, this can trigger a policy of light-weighting - meaning packaging gets thinner or smaller, but still exists as a throwaway item that can pollute our waterways and harm marine wildlife." 
 
The announcement is the latest by retailers undergoing large-scale targeting of packaging waste. 
 
In September, Sainsbury's pledged to halve the amount of plastic used in its stores by 2025.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/tesco-plastic-packaging-waste-bags-environment-trays-lids-a9180691.html

Lidl passes four million meal milestone in food waste redistribution initiative

Published: 1 Nov 2019

Lidl passes four million meal milestone in food waste redistribution initiative

Lidl has redistributed the equivalent of more than four million meals since 2017, the German supermarket chain revealed today, as it announced plans to donate a further 250,000 meals to community groups before Christmas 2019. 
 
The giveaway is part of Lidl's Feed It Back initiative, which aims to slash food waste across the retailer's supply chain, targeting a 25 per cent reduction per store by the end of 2020. 
 
Launched in 2017, Feed It Back has redistributed more than 1,800 tonnes of surplus food among more than 1,500 organisations, the firm announced today, providing the equivalent of 4.3 million meals. 
 
This winter, the firm is partnering with the charitable platform Neighbourly to give away a further 250,000 meals between 6 November and 25 December. Community projects interested in being involved can visit www.Neighbourly.com/FeedItBack to register, the firm said. 
 
"We're proud to work with Neighbourly, the food redistribution organisation connecting our stores with over 1,500 local charities, food banks and community groups who make good use of surplus food," said Christian Härtnagel, CEO at Lidl GB. "This way, as well as cutting down on food waste, we're able to support the important work these groups are doing for the people who need it most - particularly around Christmas time." 
 
The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that around a third of the food humanity produces each year ends up as waste. The environmental consequences are huge: were it a country, food waste would be the third largest emitter in the world.  
 
Within the UK, 240,000 tonnes of food is wasted by UK supermarkets every year, according to figures from waste charity Wrap.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/3083285/lidl-passes-four-million-meal-milestone-in-food-waste-redistribution-initiative

Arla UK changing labels to tackle food waste

Published: 8 Oct 2019

Arla UK changing labels to tackle food waste

According to a OnePoll survey, more than a third of those polled in the UK are unsure of the difference between 'best before' and 'use by' labels on produce.


Further Information

For further information, please visit HTTPS://WWW.DAIRYREPORTER.COM/ARTICLE/2019/09/10/ARLA-UK-CHANGING-LABELS-TO-TACKLE-FOOD-WASTE

Fruit, vegetables and wine will be scarce and costly under no-deal Brexit, warn retailers

Published: 8 Oct 2019

Fruit, vegetables and wine will be scarce and costly under no-deal Brexit, warn retailers

Fresh fruit, vegetables and wine are among the products likely to become scarcer and more expensive after a no-deal Brexit, according to a flurry of warnings issued by retailers and the drinks industry. 
 
The department store chain John Lewis and the Co-op supermarket said customers' weekly shop could be disrupted, amid concerns that retailers will have to fly in supplies if the chaos predicted in leaked government documents becomes a reality. 
 
It came as the Wine and Spirit Trade Association (WSTA) criticised the government for "reneging" on plans for a nine-month suspension of paperwork on imports on wine, the UK's most popular alcoholic drink, if no deal is reached with Brussels. 
 
In an open letter to Brexit ministers Michael Gove and Stephen Barclay, the WSTA said the added administrative burden on imports would force up the price of a bottle of wine by 10p, reduce choice, and cost the thriving UK wine industry £70m. 
 
Importers who rely on the flow of niche wines from the EU could be devastated, the trade body warned, while the UK could lose its position as the global wine hub "overnight". 
 
John Lewis also gave a grim Brexit forecast as it reported its first-ever half-year loss - of £26m. 
 
Its chairman, Sir Charlie Mayfield, a former government adviser, said the effect of leaving without a deal would be "significant and it will not be possible to mitigate that impact". He said Waitrose, part of the John Lewis group, has been stockpiling some products, including wine, olive oil and canned goods, but could not stave off disruption to the import of fresh food across the Channel. 
 
Mayfield believes people could be put off buying non-essential items from John Lewis in the run-up to Christmas if consumers anxious about economic turmoil curb their spending. 
 
The Co-op chief executive, Steve Murrells, is particularly worried about fruit because he expects prices to increase. 
 
Murrells said the convenience chain was attempting to mitigate the potential impact by stockpiling long-life products such as water, toilet paper and canned goods but was struggling to manage logistics for fruit such as blueberries, apples and pears, which are imported during the British winter. 
 
"We think there will be shortages in some fresh food areas," he said. "Where that is the case, we would endeavour to bring it in to give our customers a choice." 
 
To avoid empty shelves the Co-op would resort to using air freight to bring in fruit. The retailer sells British meat only, so those supply lines would not be affected. 
 
There were "very early signs" that Britons were stockpiling, Murrells said, predicting hoarding could intensify the closer the country gets to no deal. 
 
He said securing a deal was "the only way to avoid the inevitable impact on our customers". 
 
The chief executive of Morrisons, David Potts, said the supermarket chain's contingency plans included switching to alternative ferry crossings such as Le Havre to Portsmouth if the Dover-Calais route became gridlocked as well as measured stockpiling in the run-up to the deadline. 
 
The retailer has also secured Authorised Economic Operator certification, which Potts likened to "speedy boarding" as members of the scheme were less likely to be stopped at customs. 
 
In an apparent reference to a quote by the boxer Mike Tyson, he said the supermarket chain had plans but that "everyone has got a plan until you get punched in the face". 
Flagging its concerns for wine retailers, the WSTA said its members could end up "drowning" in red tape, including 600,000 extra customs forms, after it was told by government officials that they will not abide by an earlier promise to waive paperwork on wine imports. 
 
The WSTA said this would cost the industry £70m and threaten the UK's position as the global hub of wine, as well as adding 10p to the price of a bottle, forcing the cost of the prime minister Boris Johnson's favourite Tuscan Tignanello up to £180.10. 
 
"We can only conclude from this that government doesn't understand the value of the UK wine industry nor the value of imports in general to the UK economy," said the WSTA chief executive, Miles Beale. 
 
"The burden of import certificates for wine will not simply fall on EU businesses - their pain will be shared by UK importers and ultimately UK consumers." 
 
The WSTA's concerns revolve around the extra administrative burden that would be required in order to keep wine flowing into the UK from the EU in the event of a no-deal Brexit. 
 
Imports would require certificates known as VI 1 forms, as well as expensive lab analysis, meaning higher costs and delays for the 55% of Britain's wine imports that come from the EU.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/sep/12/co-op-boss-warns-of-no-deal-brexit-fresh-food-shortages-and-price-hikes

No-Deal Brexit Could Lead to Vegetable Shortages, U.K. Warns

Published: 8 Oct 2019



A no-deal Brexit could cause shortages of some fresh fruits and vegetables because of possible threats to time-sensitive supply chains, the U.K. government warned. 
The "just-in-time" nature of grocery logistics in the U.K., which imports half the food it eats, means even short delays at the border could reduce the availability of a "limited number of short shelf-life" goods, according to a report Tuesday. 
 
The update on the U.K.'s preparedness for a possible disorderly EU exit was released hours after Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government cast further doubt on prospects for a deal, following a call with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Around 30% of the food eaten in the U.K. comes from other EU countries. 
 
Britain's government also raised the possibility it may flout EU rules that provide special guarantees for foods that originate from a certain region, such as Champagne or feta cheese. EU guidelines ensure that more than 3,000 types of agricultural products benefit from these so-called geographical indicators. 
 
In the report, the government said that in a no-deal scenario, Britain would no longer be required to recognize this status and noted that the EU hasn't yet formally made such a request. The U.K. will establish its own such framework on Oct. 31 to ensure the continued protection of British products in domestic markets. 
 
Last month, British supermarket chain Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc said the October deadline will come after the U.K. growing season for salad and fruit, increasing reliance on European imports. Britain's two biggest grocers, Tesco Plc and J Sainsbury Plc, warned in July that the government couldn't have picked a worse date for leaving the EU. 
 
Read More: What a Crash Out of the EU May Look Like 
 
Michael Gove, the cabinet minister charged with no-deal Brexit planning, told Parliament Tuesday that a hard exit will bring challenges, but they will be overcome. 
 
The government published its worst-case scenario for a no-deal Brexit earlier this summer in a document it tried to keep secret. Code-named Yellowhammer, it described how a disorderly exit would "reduce availability and choice of products" in U.K. supermarkets, as well as increase prices.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-08/no-deal-brexit-could-hit-fruit-and-vegetable-supply-u-k-warns

Unilever announces new commitments on food waste

Published: 7 Oct 2019

Unilever announces new commitments on food waste

Unilever, owner of brands including Dove, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Omo, has committed to reducing plastic waste and helping to create a circular economy for plastics. 
Unilever has confirmed that by 2025 it will: 
 
Halve its use of virgin plastic, by reducing its absolute use of plastic packaging by more than 100,000 tonnes and accelerating its use of recycled plastic. 
Help collect and process more plastic packaging than it sells. 
This commitment makes Unilever the first major global consumer goods company to commit to an absolute plastics reduction across its portfolio. 
 
Alan Jope, ceo of Unilever, commented: "Plastic has its place, but that place is not in the environment. We can only eliminate plastic waste by acting fast and taking radical action at all points in the plastic cycle. 
 
"Our starting point has to be design, reducing the amount of plastic we use, and then making sure that what we do use increasingly comes from recycled sources. We are also committed to ensuring all our plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable." 
 
Jope added: "This demands a fundamental rethink in our approach to our packaging and products. It requires us to introduce new and innovative packaging materials and scale up new business models, like re-use and re-fill formats, at an unprecedented speed and intensity." 
 
Unilever's commitment will require the business to help collect and process around 600,000 tonnes of plastic annually by 2025. This will be delivered through investment and partnerships which are set to improve waste management infrastructure in the countries in which Unilever operates. 
 
Commenting on the commitments, Ellen MacArthur, founder of Ellen MacArthur Foundation, said: "Today's announcement by Unilever is a significant step in creating a circular economy for plastic. By eliminating unnecessary packaging through innovations such as refill, reuse, and concentrates, while increasing their use of recycled plastic, Unilever is demonstrating how businesses can move away from virgin plastics. We urge others to follow their lead, so collectively we can eliminate the plastic we don't need, innovate, so what we do need is circulated, and ultimately build an economic system where plastic packaging never becomes waste."


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.conveniencestore.co.uk/products/unilever-announces-new-commitments-on-food-waste/598276.article

Grow your own: it's good for you and the environment

Published: 7 Oct 2019

Grow your own: it's good for you and the environment

Growing our own fruit and veg is something we should all consider, says gardening columnist Debbie McMorran - for the good of the environment and our own mental health. 
 
In the last few weeks I've seen a number of advertisements for apple fairs and events. Looking out of the window I can also see quite a few which have fallen from the big apple tree in our back garden onto the lawn. 
 
With the turning of the seasons, and the recent colder weather, it is the perfect time for making apple pies, to be served warm with lashings of custard. There are sure to be hundreds of people who attend the apple celebrations over the next few weeks - but I have been wondering how many of those attending will be drawn to grow their own apples in future? 
 
With the current focus on sustainable living, and with huge pressure on supermarkets to start cutting down, and hopefully cutting out their use of single-use plastics altogether, it seems strange that people feel so passionately about these issues without considering doing something about it, and growing their own fruit and veg wherever possible. 
For many people, of course, it's an issue with space. Green spaces are decreasing, and over-development means that with land being so valuable, many homes are now not given much garden at all. 
 
Similarly, with the price of property being so high, when people do have the luxury of having a decent sized garden, they often either extend their homes (thus reducing their garden), or sell off land to make some money. These are some of the reasons that many people don't think they have enough room to grow their own fruit and vegetables. Of course, there are lots of ways around this - with many vegetables particularly, being suitable for container growing. Even apple trees can be found in small varieties, which don't need to take over your whole garden. 
 
We are fast approaching another festival where thousands and thousands of vegetables which could be easily grown at home will be purchased in supermarkets. The origins of the Jack O'Lantern and its connection with Halloween, can be traced back to Ireland, where the pumpkin was not a native vegetable, and instead turnips were carved and a candle placed inside to ward off evil spirits. When Irish settlers arrived in America, this tradition soon evolved to the current tradition we know today, using pumpkins. 
 
Pumpkins are relatively easy to grow, and don't need as much space as you might think. There is a lot of satisfaction in using a home-grown pumpkin to carve your lantern, but with the big supermarkets offering large pumpkins at such a low price, it almost certainly seems pointless to go to the effort of nurturing your own. It will be interesting to see whether - Brexit-dependent - we see a change in the prices of the items that we can buy in the supermarkets, and whether there is a move towards becoming more self-sufficient. 
 
Having grown up in a home where the majority of our fruit and vegetables were grown at home, I have always been fortunate enough to not only benefit from the extra taste found in home-grown vegetables, but also to be eating food which hasn't travelled hundreds of food miles. 
 
I can't help but wonder whether the ever increasing trend for eco-products - reusable water bottles, cotton produce bags and organic food - is because they are available in more expensive 'lifestyle' supermarkets such as Waitrose. There is no doubt that a fairly decent financial outlay is required to be able to keep up with all of these commendable lifestyle choices, and until we can address these high price-tags, we can't realistically expect those with lower incomes to be able to keep up with the sustainable food choices that are being promoted. 
 
In bygone days, the idea of growing your own food was a way of saving money - people without high salaries wouldn't have dreamt of buying all of their fruit and vegetables when they could be grown at home for a fraction of the price. I think one thing that would bring this back into common practice would be if more spaces were opened up for allotments in local communities. 
 
It is a wonderful thing that allotment waiting lists continue to exist as it shows there are still people who have a desire to grow their own, but sadly they do put people off. And often when people have the opportunity of a place, they keep hold of it for many years, in order to really see a good return on their crops - meaning that new allotment holders don't get a chance. 
 
If local authorities could set aside more space to create new allotments when they are happily granting permission to developers to build more houses, we might find that there was a shift back to the old ways of doing things. 
 
There wouldn't then be such an issue with single use plastics and food miles in supermarkets, as we would be all growing our own vegetables, and reaping the reward of not just the delicious food, but the boost to our mental health in the time spent outside nurturing them as they grow!


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.hertsad.co.uk/property/grow-your-own-fruit-and-veg-1-6310209

Households urged to recycle food waste

Published: 6 Oct 2019

Households urged to recycle food waste

Latest figures show that households in Powys are recycling on average 69 kilogrammes of food waste per household a year, 10 per cent less than the rest of the county. 
 
Now the council's Recycling and Waste Team want Newtown households to recycle all their food waste every week by using the weekly household kerbside collection service. 
 
Councillor Heulwen Hulme, Cabinet Member for Environment, said: "Food waste collection rates across the county have been fluctuating in recent months with some excellent periods and others showing a decline. 
 
"We want residents to recycle as much of their food waste as possible and will be on the streets in Newtown try to help households to get more from their waste service. 
 
"On average, 75kg of food waste is being recycled per household in the county each year but the rate varies and we want to increase food waste collection rates and cut the volume going to landfill 
 
"Sending food waste to landfill is expensive and bad for the environment. Using our kerbside collection service sees all food waste being recycled as it is sent to an anaerobic digestion facility in South Wales to make green energy and fertiliser for Welsh farmers." 
 
An analysis of residual waste suggests that as much as 16 per cent of waste put into the black wheeled bin that is sent to landfill is made up of food waste. 
 
The Newtown initiative will include roadshows at the town's library and target houses in Trehafren, Treown and other parts of the town with a leaflet and information campaign throughout October and November.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/local-hubs/mid-wales/newtown/2019/10/06/households-urged-to-recycle-food-waste/

Beat horror of Halloween food waste with this pumpkin soup recipe

Published: 4 Oct 2019

Beat horror of Halloween food waste with this pumpkin soup recipe

Pumpkins will soon be filling the supermarket shelves - but it's more than just a Jack O'Lantern, it can make a tasty Halloween dinner, too. 
 
For those mindful of food waste, the scariest thing about Halloween is seeing thousands of tasty pumpkins being used for decoration - and discarded. 
 
Pumpkins are one of those vegetables that people are reluctant to taste, let alone cook. 
 
With their tough, thick skin, peeling, chopping and de-seeding one can be a messy laborious task - but it's worth saving the meat to make a meal that will be a real treat on an autumn evening. 
 
Stats released by Oddbox, who sell subscription boxes 'wonky' produce that doesn't meet supermarkets' superficial standards, reveal Brits will bin 8 MILLION pumpkins after Halloween, with over half only being used for carving spooky faces. 
 
If you're concerned about how much food waste will come from your ghostly-celebrations, try baking a festive pumpkin pie, roast the seeds for a great healthy snack, make pumpkin puree for your own pumpkin spiced latte, use the stringy flesh for composting, and the pumpkin itself can double up as a biodegradable planter. 
 
The easiest way to use up pumpkin is to make a soup, try our recipe below. 
 
Serves: 4 
 
Ingredients 
 
1 pumpkin (deseeded and chopped) 
 
2 tbsp. coconut oil (melted) 
 
½ tsp. ground cinnamon 
 
3 cups vegetable stock 
 
1½ tbsp. curry powder 
 
1 tsp. fresh lemon juice 
 
Coriander (chopped to garnish - optional) 
 
Sea salt and pepper to taste 
 
Method 
 
Preheat oven to 220 degrees (200 fan). 
 
Chop the pumpkin into chunks and place onto a lined baking tray. 
 
Drizzle the coconut oil over the pumpkin and season with sea salt, pepper and sprinkle with cinnamon. 
 
Using your fingers, massage the pumpkin in with the coconut oil and spices. 
 
Roast for around 35 minutes or until the orange flesh is easily pierced with a fork. 
 
Place pumpkin into a blender, add vegetable stock, lemon juice and curry powder and blend until smooth. 
 
Add another cup of water to adjust consistency. 
 
Place in a medium pot and heat for a further 4-5 mins. 
 
Serve and garnish with coriander.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.heart.co.uk/lifestyle/food-drink/beat-horror-of-halloween-food-waste-with-this-pump/

Abingdon Community Fridge opens to tackle food waste

Published: 3 Oct 2019

Abingdon Community Fridge opens to tackle food waste

Abingdon mayor Charlie Birks joined residents last week to officially launch Abingdon Community Fridge. 
 
It is stocked with food that would otherwise have been thrown away and is donated by residents and supermarkets including the Co-op, Tesco and Waitrose. 
 
Anyone is welcome to take food from the fridge, which houses a selection of fresh fruits, vegetables and baked goods. 
 
The fridge is managed entirely by volunteers from The Replenish Project, a countywide food waste prevention scheme funded by Oxfordshire County Council. 
 
Volunteers say the fridge, which was donated by the Oxford Garden Project, has so far prevented more than a tonne of food from being binned and has had over 300 visitors since it was installed in August. 
 
Kerry Lock, one of the volunteers, said: "It's been fantastic to see the impact the fridge has had on the local community. 
 
"So many people have told us how much it has helped them, and it's great to see food going to those who need it rather than filling bins." 
 
Abingdon mayor Charlie Birks 
 
Rachel Burns, Waste Strategy Manager at the county council, added:"We are so pleased that local businesses are supporting the project and ensuring that good food is eaten rather than thrown away. 
 
"The fridge is also a brilliant place for residents to share food with neighbours and stop it from being discarded." 
 
She continued: "If you are emptying your fridge before a holiday or have excess produce growing in the garden, then consider taking it to your local fridge so that it can be enjoyed by others." 
 
According to the food waste charity Fareshare, 1.9 million tonnes of food is wasted by the food industry in the UK each year. 
 
It adds that 250,000 tonnes of that food is still edible - enough for 650 million meals. 
 
This is despite an estimated 8.4 million people in the UK struggling to afford to eat. 
 
Community fridge have also been opened in Blackbird Leys and Wallingford in recent months. 
 
Oxford Food Bank, which matches up excess fruit, vegetables, bakery and dairy products with charities that could make use of them, also celebrated its 10th anniversary on Sunday at its Botley base. 
 
The Abingdon fridge is located at the Abbey Centre off Audlett Drive, and is open to the public between 9.30am and 3.30pm from Monday to Friday. 
 
To keep up to date with the project search Abingdon Community Fridge on Facebook.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/news/17941790.abingdon-community-fridge-opens-tackle-food-waste/

Where does recycling and rubbish from the UK go?

Published: 30 Sep 2019

Where does recycling and rubbish from the UK go?

Waste company Biffa has been fined £350,000 for sending household waste, including used nappies and sanitary towels, to China. The waste was illegally labelled as paper. 
 
So how much of the UK's waste is recycled, and how much of it do we send abroad? 
 
How much waste does the UK produce? 
In 2016, the UK generated 222.9 million tonnes of waste, up 4% from 2014. 
 
England was responsible for 85% of the total. 
 
Construction and demolition generates the most - about 136 million tonnes a year. Mineral waste accounts for 36% of the total and includes anything that's left over from mining or quarrying, and can't be used again. 
 
The latest figures available show that UK households produced just under 27 million tonnes of waste in 2017. 
 
That's equivalent to 409 kg per person - roughly the weight of four adult giant pandas. 
 
It's mostly made up of food scraps, newspapers, cardboard, glass bottles and plastics. 
 
Much of it could be avoided. A study by the University of Sussex found that the average family in the UK throws away 20% of all the food they buy, costing up to £800 a year. 
 
How much gets recycled? 
The recycling rate for UK households' waste was 45.7% in 2017, a small increase on the previous year. 
 
Wales had the highest recycling rate in 2017 at 57.6%. It's the only UK country to exceed the EU's target to recycle at least 50% of waste from households by 2020. 
 
England and Scotland followed with 45.2% and 43.5% respectively. 
 
Comparable figures aren't available for Northern Ireland after 2014. 
 
Paper and cardboard were the most recycled materials in 2017 at 79%, followed by metal at 71.3% and glass at 67.6%. For these materials, much of the recycling is carried out in the UK. 
 
After recycling, the most common destination for the UK's rubbish is landfill, with 24% of waste sent there in 2016. 
 
In England, the amount of waste sent for incineration has been increasing, up from 10.1 to 10.8 million tonnes in 2017-18. 
 
How much of the UK's rubbish is sent abroad? 
Roughly two-thirds of plastic waste in the UK is sent overseas to be recycled - in part, to reduce costs. 
 
BBC analysis suggests the UK exported 611,000 tonnes of plastic packaging to other countries in the year to October 2018. 
 
Until January 2018, China imported most of the world's plastic waste. 
 
But due to concerns about contamination and pollution, it announced it would no longer buy recycled plastic scrap that was not 99.5% pure. 
 
The amount of the UK's plastic taken by China dropped by 94% between 2016-17 and 2017-18. 
 
Malaysia, Turkey, Poland and Indonesia picked up some of the slack. 
 
Malaysia imported 105,000 tonnes in total and was way out in front. That total was 42,000 (68%) more in 2017-18 compared with the previous year. 
 
However, in recent months, Malaysia has also pushed back. The country's environment minister Yeo Bee Yin said that it will not be "a dumping ground to the world". 
 
Malaysia has also said it would send back 3,000 tonnes of non-recyclable plastic waste to countries including the US, UK, Canada and Australia. It said the contaminated waste was smuggled in on its way to illegal processing facilities in the country. 
 
Sustainability charity Wrap has previously suggested that the increase in UK incineration rates is down to more plastic being burnt, rather than being sent abroad after China's ban. 
 
A huge amount of metal and paper is also sent overseas to be recycled. In 2018, 9.5 million tonnes of metal and 4.5 million tonnes of paper were exported, according to HM Revenue & Customs. 
 
How do other countries recycle? 
Some countries with the highest recycling rates globally include Germany, Austria and South Korea, according to a 2017 study by waste consultancy Eunomia. 
 
Policy varies widely around the world. 
 
Germany, for example, has had a deposit return scheme in place for plastic bottles since 2003. Retailers like supermarkets have to bear the costs, and are allowed to keep any unclaimed deposits that customers don't claim for returning the bottles. 
 
In Japan, everything from polystyrene and shampoo bottles, to packaging for pills, can be separated and recycled in its system. 
 
There are now also 26 certified "eco-towns", according to the Japanese environment ministry. One of them, Kamikatsu, is thought to recycle 80% of its household waste. 
 
Locals wash and sort it into more than 45 separate categories, before taking it to the recycling centre. 
 
How can I reduce my waste at home? 
Recycling and how to cut down on single-use plastic has become a hot topic of conversation in recent years. 
 
A few tips include: 
 
Use an online recycling locator tool to find out what you can and cannot recycle in your area 
Carry small reusable shopping bags or plastic containers 
Keep your recycling bin next to the main bin so you can take both out at the same time 
Food is also a significant contributor to household waste. Wrap estimates that household food waste makes up 70% of the UK total. 
 
Planning meals, freezing food and being careful not to over-buy in the shops can all help tackle food waste.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-49827945

UK food industry accelerates journey to halving food waste by 2030

Published: 30 Sep 2019

UK food industry accelerates journey to halving food waste by 2030

More than half of UK food industry turnover have now committed to the Target, Measure and Act on food waste a year on from the launch of WRAP and IFG's Food Waste Reduction Roadmap. 
 
In total 156 food businesses have committed to reducing food waste, more than double the number that committed to the Roadmap at launch. 
 
These businesses are joined by a further 29 other organisations including major trade bodies, and redistribution organisations. 
 
121 of these food businesses have provided evidence to WRAP that they are already implementing the Target, Measure, Act strategy in an effort to reduce food waste. These include all of the UK's largest grocery retailers, and over 100 other large food businesses. 
 
This represents tremendous progress towards the ambitious aim to have fifty per cent of the UK's largest 250 food businesses measuring, reporting and acting on food waste by September 2019. 
 
Together these 121 businesses have a combined turnover of over almost £220 billion, representing 50% of the overall turnover for UK food manufacture, retail and hospitality and food service. 
 
They also generate around 1.1 million tonnes of food waste in their own operations, a third of the total UK post-farm gate supply chain food waste. 
 
"Businesses that are implementing Target, Measure, Act are already reaping the benefits, and those publicly reporting comparable data show an average 7% reduction, and a combined saving of around 53,000 tonnes of food valued at over £85 million," said WRAP CEO Marcus Gover. 
 
"Working together with Courtauld 2025, the Food Waste Reduction Roadmap is putting the UK on a path to achieving Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3. 
 
"But there is much more to do, and our ambition is to have all major food businesses implementing Target, Measure Act by the end of 2026." 
 
All large grocery retailers have committed to the Roadmap and are implementing Target, Measure, Act. The 15 businesses have a collective turnover of more than £160 billion, representing almost 80% of the grocery retail and wholesale sector. 
 
Retailers are increasingly publishing their own food surplus and waste data, although more needs to be done to ensure it is reported in a consistent manner, and fully compliant with the Roadmap guidelines. 
 
The number of food producers and manufacturers committing to the Roadmap has doubled since launch, to 117. Collectively they represent around 45% of the entire sector by turnover and cover all of the major categories of food, and the different nations of the UK. 
 
Around 80% of these producers and manufacturers provided evidence that they are implementing Target, Measure, Act, representing a third of the entire sector. 
 
Almost 40 have publicly reported food surplus and food waste, the majority as part of the initiative announced by Champions 12.3 chair and Tesco CEO Dave Lewis. 
 
The number of hospitality and food service sector businesses committing to the Roadmap has also doubled since launch to 24, representing around 20% of the entire sector by turnover. 
 
They include some of the UK's largest restaurant chains, food outlets, hotel groups, contract caterers and food service providers. More than half of these have provided evidence that they are implementing Target, Measure, Act.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.fdiforum.net/mag/supply-chain/uk-food-industry-accelerates-journey-to-halving-food-waste-by-2030/

Edinburgh's recycled food waste 'boils 1.75 million kettles'

Published: 27 Sep 2019

Edinburgh's recycled food waste 'boils 1.75 million kettles'

Edinburgh residents are now recycling 700 tonnes of food waste - enough to generate electricity to boil 1.75 million kettles. 
 
More than 163,000 food waste caddies are collected in Edinburgh each week. 
 
However, the council is urging more people in the capital to recycle their food waste. 
 
The first pilot food waste collections in Edinburgh began in spring 2011. One food caddy generates enough electricity to power a TV for five hours. 
 
Food waste from Edinburgh residents goes to the food waste treatment facility at Millerhill and into an anaerobic digester. 
 
It breaks it down and produces gas, which is used to power Millerhill and goes into the national grid. 
 
The City of Edinburgh Council does not get paid for the waste. 
 
Lesley Macinnes, City of Edinburgh Council's environment convener, said: "Friday's global climate strike and the great turnout at Edinburgh's march highlighted the huge appetite to wage war on waste and protect our planet's vital resources. 
 
"Reducing consumption is clearly the very first step we need to master, but when we do have leftover food waste it's important to recycle it. 
 
"Recycling your food waste is really so simple to do but it makes an enormous difference. 
 
"Every tonne of food waste can generate enough electricity to boil 2,500 kettles - and we send 700 tonnes for recycling in Edinburgh each month, so that's a lot of cups of tea."


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-49801116

String fruit and veg bags from the 80s make a comeback at Morrisons

Published: 26 Sep 2019

String fruit and veg bags from the 80s make a comeback at Morrisons

Selling reuseable string bags is another way the supermarket chain is encouraging shoppers to reduce their plastic. 
 
Morrisons is turning back the clock this month as they've revived popular items from the 1980s. 
 
The started off with reintroducing Marathon bars - a retro edition of Snickers - and now they're making a comeback of the classic string fruit and vegetable bags. 
 
They've brought back the reuseable bags after listening to customers who want plastic free ways to carry their groceries. 
 
The move will mean that customers can buy loose fruit and veg or wrap it in a paper bag and carry it home in a string bag - just like shoppers from the 1970s and 80s. 
 
The string carriers, made from 100 per cent unbleached and untreated recycled cotton, will cost £1 and will be located in the Greengrocery area of the store. 
 
They are initially being trialled in four locations - Catcliffe, Guiseley, Halfway and Skipton - before being sold in Morrisons supermarkets across the country later this year. 
 
The bags are able to hold approximately eight kilogrammes of fresh produce - the equivalent of 26 large baking potatoes. 
 
And with 15mm holes, they will also hold most smaller types of fruits and vegetables - including garlic, kiwis and new potatoes. 
 
Natasha Cook, packaging manager at Morrisons said: "As we increase the number of loose fruit and veg we stock, we've listened to customers - who said they wanted plastic free bags to carry it home in. In our trials, customers said they felt a sense of nostalgia using the string bag - as it reminded them of shopping trips of the past." 
 
Earlier this year, Morrisons became the first supermarket to roll-out plastic free fruit and veg areas in its stores, allowing customers to choose from up to 127 varieties of loose produce.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/whats-on/shopping/string-fruit-veg-bags-80s-16985736

UK food industry exceeds roadmap ambitions to reduce food waste

Published: 26 Sep 2019

UK food industry exceeds roadmap ambitions to reduce food waste

The roadmap that was developed by WRAP and fellow charity IGD, set a goal to ensure that at least 50% of the UK's 250 largest food businesses are measuring and reporting their food waste data by September 2019. Having reached 156 businesses, the organisations have exceeded their ambitions, with the number representing more than half of UK food industry turnover. 
 
WRAP has implemented the 'Target, Measure, Act' strategy which provides businesses with steps they can take to reduce food waste in their own supply chain, and how they can engage with consumers to help reduce their food waste. 
 
121 of these food businesses have provided evidence of implementing this strategy, including all 15 of the UK's largest grocery retailers such as Sainsbury's and Tesco, and over 100 other large food businesses including Nestlé and Kraft Heinz UK. 
 
The amount of food producers and manufacturers committed to the roadmap has doubled since launch to 117, as well as the number of hospitality and food service sector businesses which has risen to 24. 
 
WRAP and IGD have broadened its membership with a further 29 other organisations, including major trade bodies and redistribution organisations. 
 
Since the launch the founders have produced more than 40 case studies representing the progress made and have delivered training workshops to the different sectors, as well as other campaigns. 
 
Marcus Gover, CEO of WRAP said: "I am delighted at the huge progress in this first year of the UK Food Waste Reduction Roadmap. 
 
"Businesses that are implementing Target, Measure, Act are already reaping the benefits, and those publicly reporting comparable data show an average 7% reduction, and a combined saving of around 53,000 tonnes of food valued at over £85m. 
 
Susan Barratt, CEO of IGD said: "IGD and WRAP continue to work very closely with these companies, giving them the tools to understand how they can measure and reduce food waste. Our industry has made great strides on this important issue in the last 12 months, but we are not complacent. 
 
"Reducing food waste is a long-term journey and we recognise there is more we can, and will, be doing in the future." 
 
According to WRAP, the UK is the first country in the world to set a nation-wide plan of this size, scale and ambition. The Food Waste Reduction Roadmap aims to have all 250 companies join by 2026 and to achieve the UN's Sustainable Development Goal Target 12.3 of halving food waste by 2030.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.foodbev.com/news/uk-food-industry-exceeds-roadmap-ambitions-to-reduce-food-waste/

Sainsbury's to scrap plastic bags

Published: 25 Sep 2019



Sainsbury's to scrap plastic bags in stores for fruit and veg - and now you have to pay 30p or bring your own. 
 
Sainsbury's is scrapping plastic bags in store for fresh food purchases from next week, meaning customers will need to bring their own or pay 30p for a reusable carrier. 
 
The supermarket will no longer provide plastic bags for loose fruit and vegetables from September 30. 
 
Shoppers will either need to bring in their own containers or buy a reusable drawstring bag for 30p. 
 
The supermarket is also scrapping plastic bags from the same date for bakery items, but here it will provide free paper bags for shoppers. 
 
Sainsbury's says it's not providing free paper bags for loose fruit and veg because it would increase the grocer's Co2 footprint. 
 
The change will apply in all convenience stores and about 500 supermarkets with more to follow. 
 
Sainsbury's has around 600 supermarkets in the UK and has pledged to reduce 50 per cent of its plastic use by 2025. 
 
In addition, the supermarket will no longer use plastic bags when delivering groceries to customers' homes from October 1. 
 
Items will instead be delivered in crates. 
 
Sainsbury's confirmed the price of deliveries will not change once the plastic bag ban begins. 
 
The supermarket has also confirmed a new trial to replace plastic sleeves on flowers with recyclable paper in 167 stores. 
 
Sainsbury's says the new initiative will remove 10tonnes of plastic from more than 1million bouquets. 
 
The trial started this week and will run for three months. 
 
A Sainsbury's spokesperson said: "We're serious about reducing plastic, as evidenced by the ambitious commitments we have made as a business this year. 
 
"The removal of plastic bags from online grocery deliveries is just another example of how we are working to achieve our wider goals." 
 
In terms of other UK supermarkets, Tesco and Iceland both trialled out packaging-free fresh produce earlier this year. 
 
Tesco and Asda have also ditched plastic bags from their online delivery service, at no extra cost to customers. 
 
While Morrisons has launched dozens of plastic-free fruit and veg areas in May.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.thesun.co.uk/money/10001988/sainsburys-delivery-plastic-bag-fruit-veg/

Half of UK households throw recyclable items in general waste, says WRAP

Published: 23 Sep 2019

Half of UK households throw recyclable items in general waste, says WRAP

As part of Recycle Week (23-29 September), the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has released the results of its 2019 Recycling Tracker, an annual survey of UK households that collects information on recycling attitudes, knowledge and behaviours. 
Key findings in the results highlight that over the past year 60 per cent of UK households report extra recycling of one or more items. However, over half of UK residents (51 per cent) dispose of recyclable items in the general waste and just over four in five (82 per cent) try to recycle one or more items at the kerbside that are not actually accepted locally, suggesting there is still consumer confusion over what can be recycled at home. 
 
This year's survey, organised by WRAP under the Recycle Now brand, gathered evidence from 5,452 online interviews, the largest sample size since the reports began in 2004. 
 
The most recent tracker also introduced a new question to assess the prevalence and strength of social norms around recycling, indicating that social norms are strongly associated with positive recycling behaviour and those who perceive a positive social norm dispose of more items correctly. 
 
According to the tracker recyclable items that are most frequently placed in general waste instead of kerbside recycling - known as 'missed capture' - are aluminium foil, aerosol cans and plastic detergent and cleaning product bottles. On average, households could recycle 1.6 more items at the kerbside. 
 
Call for consistency 
In February 2019, the government launched a series of consultations on the policies put forward in its Resources and Waste Strategy, including on its proposals for consistency in household recycling collections. 
 
Following the results of the consultation on consistency, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) announced it will be seeking to amend legislation to require all councils in England to collect 'at least' the following materials from 2023: 
 
Glass bottles and containers - including drinks bottles, condiment bottles, jars; 
Paper and card - including newspaper, cardboard packaging, writing paper; 
Plastic bottles - including clear drinks containers, HDPE (milk containers), detergent, shampoo and cleaning products; 
Plastic pots tubs and trays; and 
Steel and aluminium tins and cans. 
As part of the consistency consultation, Defra also proposed mandatory separate food waste collections for all households and free garden waste collections. 
 
This year's Recycle Now survey revealed that there has been an increase in food waste recycling, with 25 per cent of UK households saying they have recycled more food waste in the past year. The results comprised of nine per cent who are new to recycling food waste and 15 per cent who are recycling more/more consistently. 
 
By contrast, three per cent of UK households are recycling less and four per cent say they have stopped using the service altogether. Nearly two in five (38 per cent) said they do not have a food waste recycling collection. 
 
Similarly to confusion over which packaging items can go in kerbside recycling, a number of recyclable food waste items end up in general waste. 64 per cent of respondents cited putting one or more recyclable food waste items in the general waste - most commonly tea bags and coffee grounds, eggshells, bones, unopened food still in packaging, and leftover meal scrapings. 
 
The design of kerbside collection services also has an impact on food waste recycling, with households are more likely to say they are recycling more food waste in areas with a restricted residual waste collection. The survey results also found that separate food waste collections perform better, on average, than mixed collections of food and garden waste, both in terms of stronger social norms and better overall sentiment towards the service. 
 
Contamination issues 
As well as misplaced recyclables, contamination is an issue within kerbside recycling - when non-targeted or non-recyclable items are put in collections with recyclables, the recycling process is made more difficult and often leads to the whole batch being thrown in landfill. 
 
This year's tracker results show that 45 per cent of UK households put one or more items in the kerbside collection that WRAP considers to be 'serious contaminants,' including plastic bags and wrapping, toothpaste tubes, and drinking glasses and Pyrex. The inclusion of cookware such as pots, pans and cutlery, plastic toys, small electrical items and textiles in kerbside recycling has also significantly increased, adding to the contamination issue. 
 
Information on where these kinds of items can be successfully recycled can be found on the Recycle Now website, along with a guide on recycling symbols. 
 
When the results for missed capture and contamination are combined, the survey shows that UK households dispose of 3.5 items 'incorrectly' on average, relative to what their local collection accepts, again highlighting the importance of local authority consistency across the country. 
 
Commenting on the release of the survey, Peter Maddox, WRAP Director, said: "We should never shy away from constantly banging the drum for household recycling. It is hugely important to the health of the planet because small actions by a large number of people do make a difference. What you do influences your friends, family and neighbourhoods. We all take cues from others so the more of us that take recycling into our own hands - the more will join us."


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://resource.co/article/half-uk-households-throw-recyclable-items-general-waste-says-wrap

Restaurants urged to serve us less food

Published: 9 Sep 2019

Restaurants urged to serve us less food

Without quite realising it, they're choosing to do exactly what food waste campaigners want us all to do: only get served up what we'll definitely eat. 
 
Over a million tonnes of food prepared in the hospitality industry gets thrown away. And charity Wrap says 75% of it could have been eaten. 
 
This older pair's concerns are more about appetite than the environment: "We don't eat as much as we used to and we don't want to waste anything," they smile, delighted that the pub has kindly given them extra gravy to help spread their shared meal. 
 
But back in the kitchen, there's a deliberate effort to reduce what's served to reduce waste and save cash. Portion sizes are down. Garnishes and sauces are optional extras. Lined up by the sink are plates scraped clean by happy eaters. 
 
The Harrington Arms is one of over 240 Robinsons Brewery pubs to take on new guidelines from Wrap; making some small changes after monitoring and measuring what gets rejected. 
 
The charity has the backing of some big-name chefs and chains, as well as the Government. But it's tricky when companies have an obligation to serve up crowd-pleasing grub. 
 
On average about a fifth of food binned across industry is spoiled, damaged or past its best. Almost half gets the chop as it's prepped. And a third is our fault - plate waste sent back when someone cannot manage it. Salad, spuds and rice are the most over-served offenders. 
 
Robinsons Brewery estimates £8,000 worth of food is wasted in each pub and maintains customers have been supportive of the cuts. "A lot of licensees seem to think that the bigger the portion - the happier the customer. But it's not always the case," says Nick Burns, who consults on the catering across the brewery's network. 
 
"Adding that salad garnish, which may cost 30 or 40p, to the plate makes it look better but if the customer is not eating it, it's waste," 
 
Eleanor Morris has worked on Wrap's Guardians of Grub campaign that challenges businesses of all kinds to rethink how they procure, prep and present food. "Business food waste is hidden; it goes into a bin and gets taken away, so it's not really seen as a cost," she says. 
 
"But we're all surrounded by food waste. It's everybody's issue whether we're at home and whether we're eating out." 
 
It's not a new idea. Zero Waste Scotland's trial to tackle 53,000 tonnes of scraps began five years ago. The trial focused on giving out doggy bags for customers to take home their leftovers - something Angela Loftus and the team at Black Sheep Bistro in Glasgow are still keenly offering as part of their commitment to reduce stigma and boost sustainability. 
 
"If a plate comes back to the kitchen and staff are saying it's being boxed up, I feel happy about that, because I know the person enjoyed it," she says. 
 
"If customers see this is the norm in here then they feel more comfortable about it and they can just carry home our nice wee bag with them. It makes it look like it's the right thing to do." 
 
All of the ideas to reduce waste rely upon dialogue between business and customer - about what will be dished out in exchange for their cash. A meal out is still a treat for most people. Diners will only really swallow changes if they feel like they're still being offered good value for money.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49607938

Plan for food waste to be separated

Published: 7 Jan 2019

Plan for food waste to be separated

Ministers are backing the idea, but will offer it for consultation before any changes happen. 
 
The scheme would reduce greenhouse gases from landfill, but could lead to less frequent collections of general household waste. 
 
Some councils will oppose the policy unless they are given extra funds to carry out the scheme. 
 
At the moment, only around 35% of households in England are obliged to put food waste in its own caddy. 
 
That compares with 56% in Scotland and 100% in Wales. The figures exclude food waste mixed with garden waste. 
 
While the new rule would force councils to offer separate food caddies, people would not be obliged to use them. 
 
Why do we need food caddies? 
 
Unwanted food that goes into a general bin rots in landfill and creates methane - a powerful greenhouse gas. 
 
When waste food is collected separately, it can be put into an anaerobic digester - a tank in which the food breaks down into sludge, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, which can be used for generating energy or running a vehicle. 
 
The residual sludge is used as a soil fertiliser. 
 
The change will help the government reach its targets on cutting greenhouse gas emissions. 
 
Some local councils say there's a long-term bonus from having food waste separated and collecting it every week. 
 
Because when rotting food is safely in the caddy, general waste collections can be reduced to every two or more weeks without providing a feast for flies. 
 
What are the drawbacks? 
 
The policy has been controversial for people wanting bins emptied every week. Some councils say the scheme is too expensive. 
 
It creates a problem with disposing of nappies and the food waste caddies create extra clutter for front gardens or streets. 
 
But the plan does fit with the government strategy of changing our relationship with the stuff we throw away. 
 
Recyclenow, the government-backed campaign, says: "Throwing away food is a huge waste of the energy, water and packaging used in its production, transportation and storage. 
 
"If we all stopped wasting the food which could have been eaten, it would have the same CO2 impact as taking one in four cars off UK roads." 
 
Courtesy of BBC News


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46571391

Free food waste collection for every household in England

Published: 7 Jan 2019

Free food waste collection for every household in England

Weekly collections of food waste will be made from every household in England as part of a major government strategy to deal with the rubbish crisis.  
 
At the moment only about a third of local authorities collect food waste separately- while UK households throw away about 7 millions of food a year- most of which is edible.  
 
In a wide-ranging overhaul of the waste strategy, businesses will be forced to pay the full cost of recycling or disposing of their packaging waste- compared to just 10 per cent of the cost at the moment and they will also be required to take more responsibility for items that are difficult or expensive to recycle such are cars, electrical goods and batteries.  
 
Futhermore, recycling rules- which vary considerably from one local authority to another- will be made consistent- while a bottle deposit scheme is planned to begin in 2023 to  
increase recycling rates.  
 
Further and Faster 
 
"We will go further and faster, to reduce, reuse and recycle. Together we can move away from being a 'throw-away' society, to one that looks at waste as a valuable resource," said Environment Secretary Michael Gove. 
 
The announcements were broadly welcomed by campaign groups although they said they didn't go far enough in some cases.  
 
"The plans to ensure that companies who create and sell plastic packaging will at last pay for dealing with the consequences are really encouraging," said Greenpeace UK senior oceans campaigner Louise Edge.  
 
"This should be a big help in getting difficult to recycle and expensive plastic packaging off our supermarket shelves, driving better product design and much needed investment in refillable and reusable packaging," she added.  
 
'Too slow'  
 
However, these proposals only enter law in 2023 and there's no reason why it couldn't happen much sooner, she said. Friends of the Earth waste campaigner Julian Kirby added: "At long last the government appears to be getting serious about tackling England's vast mountains of waste." "But there is still too much reliance on voluntary measures and precious little commitment to targets to reduce waste and boost recycling," he said. 
 
Producer pays 
 
Producers will foot the bill for the packaging and some products they create when it is disposed of - either through a direct payment to waste system or in the form of higher prices paid to others in the supply chain. The government hopes that higher product disposal prices will encourage companies to make them more durable. It is also exploring mandatory guarntees and extended warranties on products to design products that last longer and drive up repair and reuse. The government's Resources and Waste Strategy will also seek to clamp down on waste crime, for example by increasing fines and prison sentences for fly tipping. Wales and Northern Ireland already collect food waste from every household while in Scotland most, although not all, have it collected. 
 
Courtesy of The Essential Daily Briefing


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://inews.co.uk/news/environment/free-food-waste-collection-for-every-household-in-england/

Food Waste Chief to target 'scandal' of 250m binned UK meals

Published: 7 Jan 2019

Food Waste Chief to target 'scandal' of 250m binned UK meals

The government has appointed a food waste champion to tackle the problem of 250m meals being thrown away in the UK each year. 
 
Ben Elliot, a philanthropist and co-founder of the lifestyle group Quintessentially, will aim to help the government eliminate food waste going to landfill by 2030. 
 
He was appointed to the unpaid, voluntary role by Michael Gove, the environment secretary, who described food waste as "an economic, environmental and moral scandal". 
 
Elliot's first task will be to oversee the Food Waste Fund, a £15m pilot schemewhich will redistribute surplus food, Gove said. 
 
Working with businesses and other stakeholders from across retail, manufacturing, hospitality and food services, he will also support government consultations on the introduction of mandatory food waste reduction targets and redistribution obligations. 
 
Elliot said: "While families all over the country struggle to put food on the table and children still go to school each day with empty stomachs, there continues to be an unforgivable amount of food waste, which is both morally deplorable and largely avoidable. 
 
"As a nation, we need to stop this excessive waste and ensure that surplus food finds its way to people in our society who need it most, and not let it get thrown away and go to landfill." 
 
In his role as chair of the Quintessentially Foundation, Elliot, who is the Duchess of Cornwall's nephew, has worked with the Felix Project, a charity targeting food waste and food poverty in London which claims to have diverted up to £1bn of surplus food to those in need. 
 
Currently around 43,000 tonnes of surplus food is redistributed from retailers and food manufacturers every year, the government says. It is estimated a further 100,000 tonnes of food - equating to 250m meals a year - is edible and readily available but goes uneaten. Instead, it is sent away for generating energy from waste, or for animal feed. 
 
Courtesy of The Guardian


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/31/food-waste-chief-to-target-scandal-of-250m-binned-uk-meals

Fresh Pod returns to Holland

Published: 18 Dec 2018



Returning to Holland in early January, Fresh Pod are proud to be exhibiting amongst other East Anglian food and drink producers in the UK Pavilion at the country's largest catering trade show, Horecava.  
 
Heading to RAI Amsterdam on 7th-10th January, the team are participating in an initiative led by Norfolk and Suffolk County Councils, the Department of International trade (DIT), New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), and Norfolk and Suffolk Chambers of Commerce. Noticing earlier on at this year's show that there were virtually no producers from the UK exhibiting, the team are pleased to be amongst the first from the UK to have a presence. 
 
Heading to the exhibition? Why not set up a meeting - call us on 01603 702374.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.horecava.nl/

Norfolk businesses to be UK's first to exhibit at Holland's largest hospitality trade show

Published: 26 Nov 2018

Norfolk businesses to be UK's first to exhibit at Holland's largest hospitality trade show

Burgeoning trade links between food producers from Norfolk and Suffolk and buyers in the Netherlands will take another step forward when a delegation visits the country's largest hospitality trade show. 
 
At least 10 businesses from the East of England will be travelling to Horecava in January 2019, and will have a stand alongside 600 other food and drink businesses. 
 
The trip has been organised by Norfolk County Council, Suffolk County Council, the Department of International trade (DIT), New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), and Norfolk and Suffolk Chambers of Commerce. 
 
Yare Valley Oils is one of those confirmed for the trip, which was organised following the Local Flavours show in September, which boosted trade relations between the region and the Netherlands. 
 
Dom Whyte of the Surlingham-based company said: "Going to a trade show in Holland is something we never would have done, and never would have even thought to do if it weren't for this." 
 
Yare Valley Oils, which presses rape seed into high-quality oil, will be joined by Bullards Gin, James White Drinks, Essence Monty's Foods, Quickfill, Paddy & Scotts, Taste of Suffolk, Algy's Popcorn, Fresh Pod, Nova Farina, Giffords Hall Vineyard and Stokes Sauces on the trip. 
 
Mr Whyte added: "We spoke to some Dutch delegates at Local Flavours and they believe there's a market for us over there, because currently there's not a comparable rapeseed oil product of the same quality." 
 
The business already exports in small quantities to Sweden and the US, but rarely to Holland. However it is hoping the show will also be a foot in the door to other markets. 
 
"There will also be some Belgian and German buyers at the show, which is a market we had never even considered. We don't have deals with major national brands in the UK because we have such good links with independent shops, but selling in higher quantities over there wouldn't affect business here," Mr Whyte said. 
 
Doug Field, chairman of New Anglia LEP, said: "The businesses here have it all: deep knowledge and experience of food and drink production, innovative thinking and entrepreneurial spirit. This delegation from the East of England will have first mover advantage to enter the Dutch market via this route with great professional and financial support." 
 
There are still places available to join the trip. 
 
The subsidised stand positions are aimed at small and medium-sized enterprises while larger companies have an opportunity to sponsor the stand. Contact Robert Ediker from The Lively Crew at robert@thelivelycrew.co.uk or on 01603 702374.


Further Information

For further information, please visit https://www.edp24.co.uk/business/norfolk-businesses-first-in-country-to-exhibit-holland-trade-show-1-5789367

Catch the Fresh Pod team at an event near you this Summer

Published: 8 May 2018



The Fresh Pod team will be out and about over the coming months to spread the word about reducing your fruit and vegetable waste. Estimated to save the average UK family £700 a year, Fresh Pod is the best companion for your fridge - keeping your fruit and vegetables fresher for up to 4 times longer. Be sure to pop by an event and say 'hello' to the team who will be on hand to offer food storage advice and tips, and will have 12 month kits and refill kits available for purchase. 
 
Fresh Pod will be at: 
• One Planet Norwich Festival, 9th-10th June at The Forum, Norwich. Free entry 
• Greenbuild, 8th-9th September at Felbrigg Hall, North Norfolk. Free entry 
 
We hope to see you there!

Flowers as fresh as ever this Valentine's Day and Mother's Day

Published: 7 Feb 2017

Flowers as fresh as ever this Valentine's Day and Mother's Day

Shops and warehouses are currently packed to the brim with fresh flowers, it must be coming up to Valentine's Day, Mother's Day and Easter - the busiest time of year for the flora industry. 
 
With an increase in stock to cope with demand, storage and preservation of flowers can be challenging - no matter what size of space is being used. A considerable increase in Ethylene, airborne bacteria, spores, moulds and rots in the transport and storage area environments can play havoc with maintaining shelf life during storage, preparation and final delivery to customers. 
 
How we can help 
 
Fresh Pod has been working the commercial flora industry for many years, providing solutions for all circumstances and all year round protection. 
 
A simple and effective product, it removes: 
- Ethylene 
- Airborne bacteria 
- Spores 
- Moulds 
- Rots 
from transport and storage area environments - preventing foliage and flowers from being spoiled, therefore extending their shelf life - particularly useful when mixing blooms in storage and in arrangements. 
 
We have a range of products that provide effective solutions to keeping your bouquets beautiful, fragrant and fresh for longer - from when the flowers are picked through to delivery to the end user and beyond. 
 
 
Our products 
 
We can offer 5, 9 and 28 gram sachets that can be placed in boxes to remove Ethylene when flowers are being stored and transported. 
 
We also provide box filters and machines that can be placed in store rooms to protect a whole room, keeping flowers in the best condition possible. 
 
 
What our customers say 
 
"We now use the Ethylene absorbing sachets in all boxes of flowers that we ship out. The results on Cymbidium, Ranunculus, Peonies, Phalaenopsis and some varieties of Daffodils have been fantastic.  
We highly trust Fresh Pod as the results have been so positive for us - a must when transporting flowers to keep them at their best." 
 
Get in touch with us to see how we can help you today - call us on +44 (0)1603 702374 or email us info@freshpod.co.uk

The tip of the iceberg: Lettuce rationed on nation's supermarket shelves

Published: 3 Feb 2017

The tip of the iceberg: Lettuce rationed on nation's supermarket shelves

Vegetable lovers left reeling from the recent courgette shortage have been dealt a new devastating blow, as supermarkets confirm the salad days are truly over with a lettuce shortage on UK shelves. 
 
Supermarkets have rationed the number of lettuces each customer can purchase in stores and iceberg, sweet gem and romaine varieties have been taken off sale completely by some online. 
 
The latest eggplant in the face in the European vegetable shortage, follows similar reductions in the supply of courgettes, salad peppers, brocolli and cabbage. 
 
An extreme mix of drought followed by flooding and freezing conditions has severely affected growers in southern Spain, while poor conditions have also hit farmers in Italy, Greece and Turkey. 
 
Experts have warned that if the weather does not improve in the coming weeks the problem may continue until April, with customers hit by price rises. 
 
London retail analyst Rob Gregory posted a photo on Twitter of empty boxes in a Tesco and a sign that read: "Due to continued weather problems in Spain, there is a shortage on Iceberg and other varied lettuce products. 
 
"To protect the availability for all customers, we are limiting bulk purchases to three per person." 
 
Sarah Morton, from Manchester, tweeted a photo of a Morrisons shelf label stating customers could only buy a maximum of two each. 
 
She wrote: "Why? I don't get it @Morrisons £arewerunningout.. £lettuce & £HOWMUCH££" 
 
Supermarkets have been forced to look as far afield as the US west coast - more than 5,300 miles from Britain - to meet demand.


Further Information

For further information, please visit http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/the_tip_of_the_iceberg_lettuce_rationed_on_nation_s_supermarket_shelves_1_4875162

Banana prices rise as Brexit bites

Published: 30 Nov 2016

Banana prices rise as Brexit bites

Unfavourable exchange rates force four major supermarkets to increase banana prices in past two weeks. 
 
Banana prices have risen for the first time in five years, with loose bananas up 4p per kilo at Asda, Morrisons, Lidl and Aldi. 
 
Aldi was the first to increase prices two weeks ago, and was quickly followed by the other three retailers. 
 
Barring a couple of short-lived price rises related to temporary production shortages, banana prices at Britain's major retailers have remained at or below 68p per kilo since 2011. 
 
The recent price rises appear to be related to the rising cost of imports linked to the post-Brexit devaluation of the pound. Bananas are generally bought in dollars, making the weakness of the pound problematic. 
 
This has forced supermarkets to renegotiate their arrangements with suppliers, but some retailers are now starting to struggle to absorb these costs. 
 
Asda, Morrisons, Lidl and Aldi - which are currently sourcing their bananas from Costa Rica, Cameroon, Colombia and Belize respectively - have all increased the price of a kilo of loose bananas from 68p to 72p - a rise of six per cent. 
 
Aldi has also changed the pricing on its packs of bananas, switching from 68p for 1kg to five bananas for 72p. This amounts to an even more significant price rise than in loose bananas since five bananas often weigh less than 700g, the Guardian reported. 
 
Tesco, Sainsbury's and Waitrose, meanwhile - all of which source their bananas from Colombia at this time of year - have kept their prices at 68p. Likewise, M&S Food, which is getting its supply from the Ivory Coast, has stuck with the 68p price tag.


Further Information

For further information, please visit http://www.fruitnet.com/fpj/article/170729/banana-prices-rise-as-brexit-bites?utm_source=Banana+prices+rise+as+Brexit+bites%3B+Sainsbury%E2%80%99s+win

Research underpins need for Scottish business leadership on food waste

Published: 25 Nov 2016



Scottish businesses have been urged to provide "clear leadership" on food waste, as new research shows that an estimated 1.35 million tonnes of food and drink is wasted in the country each year. 
 
Pioneering research prepared by Zero Waste Scotland has quantified food waste for all sectors of the Scottish economy. The report finds that while households accounted for 44% of the country's waste in 2013, the majority in fact came from the commercial and industrial sector. 
 
While the overwhelming majority of Scottish businesses are now following environmental regulations, Zero Waste Scotland insists that companies must step up efforts to address expensive supply chain and landfill waste to ensure efficiency and competitiveness. 
 
Zero Waste Scotland chief executive Iain Gulland said: "When we talk about the true scale of food waste in Scotland we need to look at the whole supply chain. Whilst household food waste remains the biggest sector, the fact that over half comes from business and public sector shows that we need clear leadership in these areas to make the transformative change we all want to see. 
 
"Our research shows for the first time the true scale of the challenge we face to achieve Scotland's ambitious food waste reduction target - but it's one we are determined to take on together. Tackling the scale of wasted food in our society is an economic, environmental and moral imperative." 
 
Business support 
 
According to the research, an estimated 740,000 tonnes of solid food and drink waste were produced in commercial and industrial sectors in 2013. Of this amount, the manufacturing industry accounted for around 510,000 tonnes, while the hospitality and retail sectors wasted an estimated combined total of 85,000 tonnes. 
 
Food and drink accounts for approximately 20% of Scotland's carbon footprint from consumption. To combat this, the Scottish Government recently set an ambitious target to reduce food and drink waste by 33% by 2025 compared to a 2013 baseline. Gulland believes that collaboration with organisations from all sections of the supply chain will help to develop policy options to meet the target. 
 
"We have made a good start," he said. "Since putting the issue of food waste on the map we have worked to reduce household food waste, resulting in a 6% decrease. We're also providing small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) with dedicated advice and support to reduce their food waste and related costs." 
 
Circular dreams 
 
The statistics come amid various attempts from the Scottish Government to deliver high waste reduction across the country. Zero Waste Scotland are currently seeking candidates to apply for the title of Scotland's third 'Zero Waste Town' by demonstrating a commitment to circular economy principles. 
 
SEPA recently published its new environmental regulation strategy, which will set about the task of helping regulated businesses reduce all forms of waste beyond compliance standards in ways that improves profitability and long-term viability. 
 
Earlier this year, the Government unveiled its first ever circular economy strategy, outlining bold plans to significantly reduce the country's waste in the food and construction sectors and promote recycling and reuse.


Further Information

For further information, please visit http://www.edie.net/news/5/Research-underpins-need-for-Scottish-business-leadership-on-food-waste%20/?utm_source=dailynewsletter,%20edie%20daily%20new

Could you help save broccoli from going to waste in Norfolk?

Published: 24 Nov 2016



An environmental organisation will be embarking on a mission to save vegetables in Norfolk from going to waste this Friday and are seeking last minute volunteers to lend a hand. 
 
Feedback are an environmental group working to eliminate food waste at every level, who specialise in shining a light on the hidden causes of waste across the food supply chain. 
 
On Friday, November 25 the organisation and its volunteers will be headed to Norfolk to salvage broccoli from a farm near Fakenham and redistribute it to FareShare, a charity that aims to fight hunger through the collection of surplus food. 
 
Formed in 2009, Feedback has created various campaigns over the years to help in the fight against food waste, including The Gleaning Network which is what will bring the team to the region this week. 
 
Christina O'Sullivan, Communications Coordinator at Feedback, said: "Our gleaning network coordinates volunteers, farmers and food redistribution charities to salvage the thousands of tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables that are wasted on farms every year across the UK, and direct this fresh, nutritious food to people in need. 
 
"We find out where food is being wasted, recruit volunteers to help harvest the food and then give it out to charities." 
 
She added: "We're still looking for people to help at our glean in Norfolk on Friday, so please do sign up and come along to witness the colossal waste first-hand. It'll be a great social day out for a fantastic cause!"


Further Information

For further information, please visit http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/could_you_help_save_broccoli_from_going_to_waste_in_norfolk_1_4790761?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social_Icon&utm_campai

Local Flavours - Delivered to You

Published: 9 Nov 2016

Local Flavours - Delivered to You

Following a successful fourth year of Local Flavours, the team behind the effort to get local food and drink on the shelves and menus of buyers from across the UK are launching a new initiative, to get consumers thinking about where food and drink comes from.  
 
In September, Local Flavours attracted over 1,000 buyers and 100 producers to meet and do business. Tens of thousands of pounds of business has been done through the event over the past four years. It has also got many local products manufactured in the region on the shelves and menus of many large national organisations, as well as plenty more on local menus and retail shelves.  
 
Having created and grown the annual trade event to become the biggest of its kind in the region, the organisers - The Lively Crew (TLC), have grown a reputation with food and drink producers as well as many businesses and local councils to deliver sustainable activity which benefits the local economy, and in many ways, winning the trust and respect of all those involved. 
 
With this trust TLC has had many requests from food and drink producers in the local area to explore other channels to market under the "Local Flavours" brand.  
 
Local Flavours - Delivered to You.  
Educating consumers on the benefits of buying locally produced food and drink is high on the agenda. Traceability and food security is very much part of that. Keeping spend in the local economy will benefit producers and the wider business community.  
 
Launching in November at South Norfolk Council's office, Local Flavours "Delivered to You" is a deliver to your desk service aimed at councils and larger businesses or clusters of businesses in the Eastern region. Aimed at employees of large organisations, this unique service will give producers many opportunities to reach potential consumers who may for one reason or another not have considered seeking out local produce or not have had the time to do so (never leave their desk at lunchtime).  
 
As a collective force local producers will get their produce in front of potential customers and away from the distraction of retailer's shelves, where they often compete with many major national brands.  
However, this is only a monthly service into a business or organisation, moving forward Local Flavours "Delivered to You" aims to point consumers to outlets locally where they can pick up promoted food and drink, in between monthly drops to their desks, supporting retailers such as the East of England Co-op, Roy's and Jarrolds, to name a few who actively stock and support locally produced food and drink.  
 
Once a month a catalogue and order form will land on the desk or on the computer screen of employees working for organisations participating in the scheme. Orders will be collected and delivered a week later to the office.  
A Local Flavours market stall will set up on delivery day where employees who participate in the delivery scheme will pick up recipe ideas, be introduced to seasonal offerings and enjoy regular sampling and other food and drink related activity. All aimed at the continuing education of getting over the benefits of buying (even if only a jar of jam every month) and keeping the pound in the local economy.  
 
South Norfolk Council are working with The Lively Crew to get the latest scheme off the ground. South Norfolk Council have been a sponsor and supporter of Local Flavours, the annual trade event since it began in 2013. Subsidising stand space for businesses based in the district so even the smallest start up producer can experience and participate in meeting national buyers (some as big as Tesco and Morrison's) and in a supportive and less intimidating environment, which is often the case if visiting a national head office.  
 
Local Flavours "Delivered to You" aims to grow the service through other councils, organisations and businesses over the coming months and quite quickly.  
Councillor Clayton Hudson, South Norfolk cabinet member for Stronger Communities and Leisure said, "The Council is pleased to be able to support Local Flavours and our excellent, local food and drink producers. Delivered to You makes it even easier to buy great quality, locally produced food and drink, helping the local economy and helping the environment by cutting food miles." 
 
Valerie Watson-Brown, Director of TLC Local Flavours "Delivered to You" is a great opportunity to get local producer recognised on their doorstep and to educate consumers on the many benefits of spending money within the local community. We have a fantastic range of food and drink produced locally and this latest Local Flavours initiative will go way above any other activity to date to promote producers and as a collective".  
 
"It is possible because councils and local businesses can see a clear benefit to the local economy and in measurable terms and where else will consumers get such an opportunity to sample such fine produce without the need to even leave their workspace".  
 
Any business or organisation interested in participating in the scheme should contact Faye Bullard, telephone 01603 702374 or email faye@thelivelycrew.co.uk

Climate Conference Aims To Put Paris Agreement Into Action

Published: 8 Nov 2016

Climate Conference Aims To Put Paris Agreement Into Action

Leaders from 195 countries are meeting in Morocco to discuss how to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. 
 
The United Nations climate change conference began Monday and runs through Nov. 18. It is the first major climate meeting since the Paris climate change agreement was passed at last year's conference. 
 
The main goal of that agreement is to prevent catastrophic warming of the earth by "[holding] the increase in global average temperature to well below 2 degrees [Celsius] above pre-industrial levels." 
 
As we have reported, the global average temperature has already risen about 1 degree Celsius, relative to pre-industrial levels. 
 
To meet the 2-degree goal, each country that signed on to the Paris agreement has already submitted a national plan for how it will curb greenhouse gas emissions. India, for example, promised to generate 40 percent of its electricity with non-fossil fuel sources by 2030. 
 
The U.S. plan promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions across the economy by 26 percent to 28 percent in 2025, compared to 2005 levels. The U.S. is the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gasses after China. 
 
The Chinese government also signed onto the plan, pledging that emissions there will peak in 2030 and then decline. 
 
But there are still questions about how to hold countries accountable for their pledges, and how to pay for some of the initiatives countries describe in their plans. Those issues will both come up at the conference underway in Morocco. 
 
Susan Phillips of NPR member station WHYY is covering the conference in Marrakech, Morrocco, and reported that, "Developing nations want wealthier countries to help finance their efforts to reduce emissions and prepare for rising sea levels." 
 
As The Two-Way has reported, India has called on the U.S. and other countries to share technologies that help decrease emissions. 
 
The timing of the U.S. presidential election during the conference could be relevant to the question of accountability, since the two major-party presidential candidates disagree on how the U.S. should or shouldn't implement the climate agreement. 
 
Phillips reports Hillary Clinton wants to continue the pledges the U.S. agreed to in Paris and boost renewable energy like solar, while Donald Trump says he wants to pull the U.S out of the climate agreement and burn more coal. 
 
At a State Department briefing last week, the director for energy and climate change for the National Security Council, John Morton, told reporters, "obviously, I think there is a great deal of interest not just domestically, but internationally in terms of what the election outcome will be." He acknowledged "the candidates have very different views on climate." 
 
Morton said that, although the outcome of the election could affect "how quickly the U.S. moves [to limit emissions] ... the international community is moving forward." 
 
Morton continued: 
 
"I think what we have seen in recent months and, in fact, in recent years is a recognized inevitability of the transition to a low-carbon economy. And so the international community - the international business community, the international policy community - is moving forward and will continue to move forward." 
"I think the question of commitment to action is no longer one which is being debated," Morton said, adding that the issue at hand is "frankly, who will lead and who will benefit most from this transition to a lower-carbon economy." 
 
Courtesy of NPR News


Further Information

For further information, please visit http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/11/08/501194848/climate-conference-aims-to-put-paris-agreement-into-action

On a mission to climb Kilimanjaro for local charity ZSEA

Published: 28 Oct 2016

On a mission to climb Kilimanjaro for local charity ZSEA

Our Fresh Pod Director is on a mission. Our passion for supporting the environment extends to wildlife and during a recent conversation on worldwide animal conservation she agreed to attempt a climb of Kilimanjaro for the Zoological Society of East Anglia (ZSEA). 
 
The attempt in January 2017 needs encouragement and support, so to help with the climb and during the month of November, anyone purchasing a consumer Fresh Pod 12 month kit will see 20% of their purchase donated to the ZSEA charity. 
 
Everyone is a winner, the buyer will enjoy less waste and more money in the pocket, the planet will benefit from reduced landfill, animal conservation will get a boost and our Director Valerie will push harder in training in view of the support coming in. 
 
With Christmas around the corner, shop early and treat family and friends to a 12 month Fresh Pod kit. Visit the website and quote ZSEA20 in the promotional code box when placing your order. Alternatively ring 01603 702374 and we can take your order over the phone.

Avoid the dreaded droop this Mother's Day!

Published: 26 Feb 2016

Avoid the dreaded droop this Mother's Day!

Being one of the busiest times of the year for the horticultural industry, keeping flowers fresh from cutting, through to the end user can be at times stressful and wasteful.  
 
Crowded store rooms, transportation, shops and boxes create an Ethylene filled environment which shortens a flower's life span, meaning more waste, more costs and less display time.  
 
The situation is even worse at busy times of year when ordering more stock and is magnified when different species are mixed together in storage or on display.  
 
Flowers give off Ethylene gas naturally as they age. They are also sensitive to the gas which causes them to deteriorate causing a whole host of different symptoms, including premature flowering, drooping buds, leaf discolouration and release, brown buds etc.  
 
Whether in transport, in shipping or airline containers, boxes, stored in warehouses, retail environments in displays of delivered to homes; flowers are constantly in danger of early deterioration from Ethylene gas.  
 
There is a simple and effective solution and costs pennies - Fresh Pod.  
 
Fresh Pod is a 100% safe and natural, and it works by removing Ethylene and other airborne rots, spores and molds in storage and transport which will ensure fresh produce stays in tip top condition through the journey from harvesting to the end user, giving flexibility in the sales process whilst extending the life by up to four times.  
 
Whether needing that extra help with freshness at busy times of the year or ongoing protection, Fresh Pod will save you time and money reducing waste and costs associated with it.  
 
For more information, contact Robert on 01603 702374 or email us - robert@freshpod.co.uk  
 
PS Our sister product Chill Pod provides bespoke protection from temperature fluctuation in storage and transport. Visit the website (www.enviro-pod.co.uk) for more information on our unique thermal material.

Fresh Pod will be exhibiting at Fruit Logisitica 2016

Published: 25 Jan 2016

Fresh Pod will be exhibiting at Fruit Logisitica 2016

Happy New Year to you!  
 
Fresh Pod and Chill Pod are excited to announce that we will be exhibiting at Fruit Logistica 2016, 3rd - 5th February, Berlin - alongside our partners Panalpina and Jupiter Marketing.  
 
Aside from updating visitors to the stand on how Fresh Pod gives many growers, producers, wholesalers, exporters and importers more flexibility through the post-harvest process. We can advise on reducing stock losses and maximizing profitability.  
Fresh Pod has a solution for all businesses working with fruit, vegetables and flowers across the supply chain. It also works well with and is approved for use with organics.  
 
Our sister company Chill Pod will be joining Fresh Pod on the stand, launching a new space saver product which can be used for transport and temporary storage of produce in a chilled, warm or ambient environment.  
Independently tested and approved to hold an acceptable temperature for hours, as well as out performing other thermal retaining materials on the market.  
 
For more information on Fresh Pod or Chill Pod contact Mike on (+44)1603 702374 or email us info@freshpod.co.uk  
 
If visiting Fruit Logistica and you wish for a more formal one to one meeting, let us know what time and day you will be at the show.

Kitchen storage solutions - for excessive times of year

Published: 16 Dec 2015



Enjoy 10% off Fresh Pod or Chill Pod commercial and/or consumer products for your business, your home or as a gift.  
Fresh Pod works extremely well in a consumer or commercial environment. It keeps fruit and vegetables crispy, tasty and fresh for up to 4 times longer, reducing food waste, saving money and contributing to a greener environment (works with flowers too).  
 
Consumer  
The perfect fridge companion at those times of the year when purchasing and storing more produce than usual. Fresh Pod is completely safe and natural and for the consumer, it comes in a 12-month kit to give your fridge and fruit bowl protection for a whole year.  
 
With the average household wasting over £480 of fresh produce every year, Fresh Pod will save a family a fortune (in fact pay for Xmas 2016).  
Visit our website www.freshpod.co.uk for more details and to order, use code XMAS10 at the checkout to claim 10% off your order. Alternatively call the team on 01603 702374.  
 
Plenty in stock but order by Friday 18th December to ensure delivery before filling up on fresh produce in the home, or to make sure your gift shopping is completed in time for the 25th December.  
 
Commercial  
Available in sachets, filter or plug in form, a solution for all transport and storage areas. Ideal for use when coping with extended periods of time between deliveries over a bank holiday period, or any time when collecting and storing more produce than usual.  
 
Fresh Pod is already working in commercial areas across the food chain as well as across Europe, including working in farm storage, importing and exporting, wholesaling, retail, hospitality and catering, as well as in the home.  
 
Protecting boxes, containers, fridges and store rooms, shops and restaurants and the largest of warehouses, Fresh Pod have solutions to suit all situations.  
 
For more information on commercial storage telephone Valerie on 01603 702374 or email info@freshpod.co.uk  
 
 
The Chill Pod range, including Thermal Space Saver  
 
Keeps produce warm or chilled at an acceptable temperature for up to 9 hours without the need for electricity or other aids.  
 
With consumer and commercial solutions, developed from NASA's research into reflective materials, Chill Pod is your mobile fridge or food warmer. Perfect for creating additional spaces in the kitchen or when transporting goods, especially when the usual storage space is already full.  
 
Consumer  
The consumer bags come in a choice of two styles and either as a wipe clean material, or a soft material which is machine The consumer bags come in a choice of two styles and either as a wipe clean material, or a soft material which is machine washable. Ideal for shopping, for temporary storage in transport or in the home.  
 
"I have used this bag many times and I have found it is brilliant. When travelling it will keep frozen food for a long journey and it is brilliant for picnics, the food is like it has just come out of the fridge. Love it for storing my shopping, bought at lunch time and not home until 6, still chilled" - Chill Pod user  
 
Commercial  
Commercial customers can choose from standard products or bespoke roll cage covers, pallet covers, tote bags and space saver kits depending on needs. There are limited standard products in stock available for despatch now and before Christmas week (subject to availability).  
 
For our full range of products please visit www.enviro-pod.co.uk, telephone 01603 702374 to check for availability.  
 
We wish all our readers a special festive season and a prosperous 2016. Working together we can make a positive impact on climate change.

Fresh Pod - Food Matters Live 2015

Published: 15 Dec 2015



Fresh Pod recently exhibited at Food Matters Live 2015 where we made it to the finals of the Unilever Innovation Awards. We are really pleased to have been recognised for the work we do in reducing food waste in the consumer and commercial world.

Fresh Pod support Unicef on World Food Day

Published: 19 Oct 2015



To help raise awareness of World Food Day, Fresh Pod will donate 20% of each sale of their 12 month kits between Friday 16th October and Friday 30th October to Unicef.  
 
Unicef work in over 190 countries in the world, actively helping hungry and malnourished children and providing 80% of the world's life-saving emergency food.  
 
World Food Day originated in 1979 and celebrates the creation of the 'Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) on 16th October 1945. It is a day of action that highlights the issues of severe hunger and poverty, and encourages supporters to come together to raise awareness and promote affirmative action to assist in finding a solution to this ongoing problem.  
 
The day is supported by over 150 countries, all of whom assist in the fight against chronic hunger and food waste. Hunger kills more people every year than Malaria, Tuberculosis and Aids combined.  
 
Chronic hunger can be stopped with the help of every individual.  
 
A third of the food produced in the world for human consumption - approximately 1.3 billion tons is lost or wasted. In the UK alone on average £480 of food is wasted per year with an estimated 66% being fruit and vegetables.  
 
You can do your bit to help eradicate food waste by purchasing a 12 month supply kit from Fresh Pod.  
 
Fresh Pod is an innovative product that can extend the life of your fruit and vegetables by up to four times as long without reducing taste and quality. It can help you stop unnecessary food waste and sustain a greener footprint. Fresh Pod is non toxic, completely natural and safe to use.  
 
A 12 month kit is £12.99 (including p&p).  
 
To buy your Fresh Pod 12 month kit and ensure that 20% of your purchase goes to Unicef, enter code WFD2015 at the checkout.  
 
Email us or call 01603 702374 to speak to one of the team.  
 
Offer runs from Friday 16th October until Friday 30th October.  
 
Fresh Pod makes the perfect Christmas gift so make sure you stock up now and support Unicef with your efforts.

Fresh Pod trial outcome and storage tips - Dan Neuteboom of Real English Fruit.

Published: 2 Sep 2015

Fresh Pod trial outcome and storage tips - Dan Neuteboom of Real English Fruit.

Founded around a very successful 12-month consumer kit to reduce fresh produce waste, Fresh Pod launched their commercial filters 5 years ago and now have over 50 of their powered ethylene filters in use as well as hundreds of box filters for smaller commercial stores.  
 
The founder's core ethos has remained in the reduction of post harvest waste though concerned that they are only reaching the larger players in the sector who better to ask for guidance than Dan Neuteboom of Real English Fruit who has used one of their box filters for the last 11 months.  
Gaining his degree in Agriculture and Horticulture in his native Netherlands and following practical experience on fruit farms in Germany and France, Dan planted his first orchard of 30 acres in East Suffolk in 1960. In partnership with other local growers, gradually more acres were planted. Between 1972 and 1978 he served on the Management committee of East Malling Research Station and today maintains his involvement by supplying local markets as well as having his own market outlet.  
 
Dan Neuteboom 'The increased rate of ripening caused by ethylene and therefore a reduced storage life of the fruit has been known for some time. With great success we used the ethylene remover called Fresh Pod. In summary the fruit kept better and over a longer period, without losing its flavour or firmness. However the following points need to be taken in consideration.  
 
- It is best to store fruit which is slightly under ripe. This in order to maintain fruit firmness.  
- Varieties which by nature are suitable for extended storage life, will produce the best result.  
- Gather the fruit for storage, when the fruit is at its coolest; early in the morning.  
- Store the fruit in open crates to ensure good air circulation.  
- Make sure the filter is placed in the air stream, direct off the cooler.  
- Do not store damaged fruit, but only the best undamaged ones.  
- At all times remove regularly, fruits which show early fruit rot spots, once in store.  
- Keep up humidity level during the storage period  
- Storage temperature needs to be ideally, around 3 to 4 degree Celcius.  
- Keep the storage area rodent free. Mice love fruit as well!  
 
Drawing on these ten recommendations the 20 inch box filter was used by Dan for an 11 month period in a fruit store roughly the size of a shipping container after which the filter media was checked for efficacy. Most of the media had been utilized and there was roughly a month or so of life left in it.  
Given the onset of the apple and pear season it made sense to change it however to ensure another 12 months of clean air as its scrubs out air borne fungal spores and bacteria as well as ethylene.

Have you ever stopped and thought about how much money you waste throwing uneaten food in the bin?

Published: 18 Aug 2015



Food waste - some simple tips to save you £00's per year 
 
Since 2007 avoidable food and drink waste (that which could have been consumed) has been reduced by 21% saving consumers £3.3bn a year. There is still however 7 million tonnes, most of which could have been consumed, being thrown away at a cost of £12.5bn a year and immeasurable costs to the environment. 
 
By adopting a few simple habits in the way we manage our kitchens it is possible to save several hundred pounds a year per household to spend on more enjoyable things like a holiday. It could pay for the car tax and insurance as well as a service probably if you feel you may be a serious offender! 
 
Refrigerators 
Make full use of them and most importantly check the temperature with a thermometer. The recommended temperature is between 0°C and 5°C to keep food fresher for longer. 
 
Freezers 
The perfect way to manage our food. Store portion size meals in air tight containers and date them for future use. 
 
Shopping lists 
It may seem 'old hat' but its well proven that by checking the cupboards and fridge before you go shopping and making a list of what you need will save overbuying and as a consequence overspending on what may ultimately end up in the bin. 
 
Pasta and Rice 
Always keep a stock of these staple foods so that you can be creative with whatever you have leftover in the fridge and make a nourishing meal 
 
Keep devices to hand 
Weighing scales, measuring jugs, freezer bags, labels and bag clips should be kept conveniently to hand to ensure portion sizes are controlled and any leftovers swiftly and properly stored for future use. 
 
Airtight containers 
Keep a range of sizes for storing and labeling leftovers for future use. Pasta dishes or Shepherd's pie for instance can be safely stored in the fridge for a couple of days or for longer in the freezer. 
 
 
 
Bread 
All bread type products are best stored in a bread bin or cupboard not left out on a board unless you plan to eat it immediately. 
 
 
 
Fruit and vegetables 
With the exception of potatoes and bananas all fruit and vegetables are best kept in the fridge and free from the ethylene gas which they naturally produce to ripen themselves. If you use a fruit bowl adding bananas to it will ripen, and as a consequence rot, your fruit quicker as their respiratory rates of ethylene are very high...hang them separately at room temperature. Potatoes are best stored in a dark place reducing the risk of them shooting or going green. 
 
Fresh Pod is a useful piece of equipment which costs pence but can actually extend the life of fruit and vegetables in your fridge or fruit bowl. 100% safe and natural it works by removing Ethylene and will extend the life of fruit and vegetables by up to four times.  
 
 
These simple steps will become habits, if they are not already, and eventually embed themselves into the way you manage your food purchasing and consumption. Government research indicates that a saving of up to £680 per year for the average household is the reward for your efforts...that is £1.86 per day in your pocket for reducing the impact on the environment. 
 
 
 
Mike Brown 
Director of Fresh Pod 
(and food lover)

Waste Week - West Walton Schoolchildren get new 'Vege Pals'

Published: 3 Mar 2015



As part of national Waste Week, on 6th March children at West Walton School will be following Miranda Hart in making their own Vege Pals to show that even misshapen fruit and veg can be made interesting. 
 
As well as making the Vege Pals, the children will each be given a Fresh Pod to take home for their parents to put in their fridge salad drawer to keep their Vege Pal fresh for up to four times longer than normal. 
 
Vege Pals is a joint initiative between West Walton School and the waste and recycling team at the Borough Council of King's Lynn & West Norfolk where Councillor Brian Long is both portfolio holder, and local Councillor for the school. 
 
Councillor Long said: 
 
"At present, In the UK, over 10% of the food and drink we buy in our weekly shop ends up in the bin when it could have been eaten. Two out of five pieces of fruit or veg don't even make it into the shops as they're deemed too 'ugly' to sell by supermarkets. That's a lot of unnecessary food waste that we have to deal with. 
 
"I think it's great that the school is participating in this event. It's a fun way to get over a serious message - that we can all save money and create less waste if we worry less about how our vegetables look, and more about how they taste. It also clearly shows how we can all buy, store and use our fruit and vegetables more wisely." 
 
West Walton School is part of the Windmill Primary Federation, consisting of West Walton, Terrington St. John, Walpole Highway, and Tilney St. Lawrence Primary Schools. Executive Headteacher across the partnership, Ms J Davis, said: 
 
"We like to encourage our pupils to be aware of the world around them, and to know that they can play an active part in shaping that world. Making Vege Pals, and taking home a Fresh Pod to keep fruit and veg fresh for longer, is a really practical way of showing their mums and dads that we can all do something to reduce food waste."  
 
Fresh Pod is a local Norwich company, and local Norfolk people have been quick to pick up on the difference it can make in preventing fruit and veg from deteriorating too quickly. As part of the Council's drive to reduce food waste, Food Pods will soon be available to buy from the same distribution centres as the bags for the Borough's food waste caddies.  
 
The Director of Fresh Pod, Valerie Watson-Brown, said: 
 
"We're delighted to play our part in showing local children, and their mums and dads that we all need to be more aware of wasting food. We hope that by making the Fresh Pod available across the Borough of King's Lynn & West Norfolk, we can ensure that everyone will have the opportunity to prevent food waste and save money." 
 
Vege Pals is part of Waste Week driven by EDF Energy on their Pod website (http://jointhepod.org/home) , which contains lots of interesting educational resources and information for schools and community groups.

Brassica & Leafy Salad Conference 2015 - Inspired thoughts!

Published: 10 Feb 2015



Mike Brown - Fresh Pod, Technical Director. 
 
Bringing together the Brassica and Leafy Salad's annual conferences for 2015 worked well and with that broadened the speaker content. Whilst the conference presentations are always very good I felt that this year everyone of them was exceptional and very topical. 
 
The price pressures on fresh produce are well documented and last year saw a lot of merger and acquisition activity in the sector in an effort to scale up further and drive down unit costs. Not surprisingly then Meurig's opening address focussed on production efficiencies through science, political lobbying and continued effort with supply chain management- all essential to maintain farming's fundamental contribution to the economy. 
 
This was further endorsed by Elena Ozeritska 
It was delightful to see a familiar young graduates name highlighted as part of the team working on the storage life of broccoli. Lisa Wray-French, now working with Debbie Rees, Karen Thurston and Richard Colgan at Greenwich used our consumer Fresh Pod product as the basis for her masters dissertation a couple of years ago and as a piece of work it's quite brilliant in its structure and detail. If anyone would like a copy then do email us as it's essential that these rising stars in the sector get recognised for the major contributions that they make.  
 
Edward Garner's informative presentation 'the perfect storm' on grocery retailing led perfectly into that made by Azmina Govindji. Azmina is a key opinion leader on nutrition and her message 'just one more' makes perfect sense to encourage more consumption of fruit and vegetables. 
 
Finally I must highlight Rick Antle's contribution to the conference. Family controlled businesses are as fundamental to the American economy as they are in the UK. Since I did my masters in 2008 on that very subject the continuous use of 'SME' in the UK when making reference to them irks me as it is an injustice and dismissive. They have unique qualities of their own, more often than not great values and seem to have resilience to recessions like no other structure. Ricks forthright stance on Quality, Service, Innovation, Attitude, Ownership and Accountability held nothing back...it was so heartening to hear. 
 
Tanimura & Antle are the biggest salad producer in the world it seems so who better to ask about waste reduction than Rick himself. You could have knocked me over when he said EC's from California...the very ones we are importing under licence here in Europe as well as the machines we developed with them. 'We have them in our coolers but once the produce leaves us it's someone else's problem'...if the fresh produce supply chain really was simplified to the point that each component was accountable as it is in Ricks world maybe we would start making some inroads into that waste problem??

We're exhibiting at Food Matters Live!

Published: 11 Nov 2014



Food Matters Live is a highly professional unique show unlike any other in the Food and Drink Sector - and subsequently there are many unique opportunities at FML for visitors from NPD, Production, R&D, Packaging and Marketing.  
 
Taking place at London's ExCeL from Tuesday 18 to Thursday 20 November, Food Matters Live is a unique cross-sector forum that's set to attract some 10,000 visitors from the worlds of health, nutrition, research, food and drink retail & manufacturing and government.  
 
It will offer professionals from the industry a host of opportunities to network and collaborate with key figures from across the food and drink sectors, as well as to explore solutions to some of the most urgent issues on the UK's health agenda. 
 
Food Matters Live is supported by the most influential bodies, across Government, the food and drink industry, academia, R&D and highly regarded health and nutrition professionals - reflecting the breadth of the event's content, its stakeholders and participants. 
 
Top tier supporters include the Department of Health, the British Dietetic Association, the Institute of Food Science and Technology, the Food and Drink Federation, Leatherhead Research and Campden BRI. 
 
The three-day event will host a carefully planned exhibition featuring 200 leading organisations, as well as providing an unrivalled education programme delivered by more than 450 speakers.  
Conference sessions will feature world-leading experts in nutrition, health and food trends, as well as government ministers, writers and broadcasters, while a wide range of seminars will examine a broad range of topics, from the alarming rise of childhood malnutrition to new ingredients that promise cognitive or cardiovascular health benefits. 
 
We have been approached by several large food manufacturers and retailers such as KP Snacks, Unilever, Tesco, Nestle etc who have recognised the hugely relevant educational and research opportunities at Food Matters Live, to hold guided tours or 'meet and greets' for their staff where they will be using visits to Food Matters Live as training and personal development days.  
 
You can register for free tickets at www.foodmatterslive.com

Eating fruits and vegetables early in life lowers heart disease risk by 40 percent as we age

Published: 5 Nov 2014



It is common knowledge that eating vegetables and fruits is part of a sensible diet, and yet millions of otherwise health-conscious people ignore this advice and continue to nosh on a variety of processed junk foods placing them at considerable risk to succumb to the leading killer of men and women in the US and western societies. Mortality statistics clearly show that more than half of all deaths each year are due to cardiovascular disease, a largely preventable illness that can squelch life in an instant or dramatically lower quality of life as the heart is strained to supply oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. 
 
Researchers from the Minneapolis Heart Institute have presented the results of their research to the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session that demonstrates how women who were eating a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables as young adults were much less likely to have plaque build-up in their arteries 20 years later compared with those who consumed lower amounts of these foods. Prior studies have provided incidental evidence about the importance of eating a diet packed with fresh produce in its natural form, but this research provided documented proof by utilizing Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC) scans that show the percentage of arterial blockage in the heart by measuring vascular calcification. 
 
Courtesy of Natural News 
http://bit.ly/Ty97JD

Co-op's UK apples in 'more stores than other retailers' bid

Published: 10 Oct 2014



The Co-operative Food is planning to sell Red Tractor-approved British apples in more stores than any other retailer this season. 
 
Carla Mills, fruit buyer at The Co-operative Food said: "This year's bumper crop of great quality fruit will help us to showcase some of the traditional favourites much loved by our customers. Traditional British varieties such as Discovery, Galmac, Early Windsor, Red Windsor, Spartan, Worcester, Wellant, Cameo, Scrumptious, Egremont Russet, Red Pippin, and Red Falstaff will all be sold in our Co-operative Dessert Apple pack, and will change variety as the season progresses. 
 
"With their unique flavour and perfumed scent, many of the older British varieties are now hard to come by, and their short season should be celebrated, and enjoyed whilst available. These varieties will join classic favourites Cox and Gala, Braeburn and of course Bramley. 
 
She added: "We want to show our support to our British apple growers whilst giving customers a great range of British apples and pears to choose from." 
 
Tesco sold more English apples and pears in 2013-14 than any other retailer, according to an independent industry league table. 
 
Courtesy of Fresh Produce Journal. 
http://bit.ly/1oXaiuX

Coming to a rooftop near you - the urban growing revolution

Published: 3 Oct 2014



Could London, New York and other cities be self-sufficient in fruit and vegetables? Yes, writes Rachel Dring, by converting wasted roof space into gardens and greenhouses. Benefits include reducing waste; raising energy efficiency, sustainability and food security; and healthier, more connected citizens. 
 
When Tiana Begum and her two teenagers moved into their new home in a 1970's council flat in West London, the landlord didn't just hand over the keys. 
 
He also gave them the pamphlet for their local veg-box scheme, which delivers fresh produce grown in the rooftop greenhouse above their heads. 
 
"That's not food miles", Tiana exclaimed, "that's food metres!" 
 
They get a discount when they volunteer a few hours a week with growing and distributing the food. Tiana also soon discovered their energy bills are 40% cheaper due to the insulating effect of the greenhouse. 
 
These benefits come with some rules - you must separate your food waste from the rest of your household waste. This is collected weekly and converted to compost for the greenhouse via local anaerobic digesters. 
 
You also have to share the elevators with the farmers, so lifts littered with leaves or a roll cage full of produce are a regular occurrence. When there's a glut, Tiana helps convert the surplus crops into chutneys and preserves, which she sells online, in the in-house community kitchen. 
 
Her children are also getting involved. Her daughter, Thameda, who's finishing school soon, has been offered a paid apprenticeship as a horticultural trainee at the greenhouse. 
 
Her 14-year-old son, Amit, who never used to be keen on eating his greens has changed his tune since helping out with the growing and harvesting: 
 
"These vegetables actually taste of something. Vegetables used to be so bland but the ones they grow upstairs have so much flavour." 
 
Courtesy of the Ecologist. For more information please visit their website here. 
http://bit.ly/1oGSTXq

Fresh Pod is directly involved with DEFRA

Published: 18 Aug 2014



We are directly involved with DEFRA on the British Food Plan which is a brilliant initiative to drive the sale of British produce in the public sector as well as exports. Our local MP, Elizabeth Truss has recently been made Secretary of State for the Environment and knowing Liz she will be as committed to this plan as she was to her previous role in education. Not a lady to be sidetracked with bureaucracy when she has made a commitment.

Swindon entrepreneur comes up with veggie version of Top Trumps game

Published: 7 Aug 2014



Seven years ago Mike, 32, from Redhouse, had the idea of developing his own version of Top Trumps, which would help youngsters to learn about the importance of fruit and vegetables. 
 
Now Veggie Trumps is ready to go into print and the marketing manager is collecting funds to produce the first copies of the game. 
 
Top Trumps is a much-loved game among youngsters where each player is dealt cards with different strengths which they use to try and win the whole set. 
 
Over the years there have been many categories, ranging from motor cars to mythical creatures. Mike's version will highlight different fruit and vegetables, which he hopes will increase young people's understanding of their healthy properties. 
 
Each item will be a different character and players will compete on different factors, such as the amount of vitamin C in certain fruit and veg. 
 
He said: "I was round at a friend's house and his young son didn't know what an avocado was. I grew up in the north of England so we didn't really have exotic fruits then. 
 
"These days I thought kids knew all about fruit and veg with all the coverage on television but that's not the case. 
 
"I developed the game on the back of that. It will help to teach children about the produce as well as increasing their social skills. 
 
"My dream is to see children playing the game or see it on a shelf shop." 
 
In order to get the idea up and running, Mike has set up a Kick Starter Page where he is hoping to raise £8,000. 
 
People can pledge differing amounts of money, which will be used to print off copies of Veggie Trumps so Mike can test its popularity. 
 
He said: "I can use the first copies to send to schools and teachers so I can see how it's received. 
 
"Every week we get several messages from people wanting to find out more so I am confident it will be a success. 
 
"If it goes down well the next stage is to look for a distributor. Depending on how much people pledge they get something like a copy of the cards or limited edition character cards. 
 
"We hit 26 per cent of our target at the weekend with a month still to go so I'm hopeful." 
 
Courtesy of Fresh Plaza 
http://bit.ly/1okew2W

Spain: Low prices and sales of late oranges

Published: 3 Jul 2014



The situation of previous weeks is being repeated, with low prices for the late orange varieties, as well as an almost complete halt of sales. For their part, Verna lemons have registered a recovery of both prices and sales volumes. 
 
 
Production and sales at orange handling facility  
The significant drop in orange consumption volumes in Europe has been determining in slowing down the pace of work at Andalusia's handling facilities. The low demand has also entailed prices dropping to unprofitable levels.  
 
 
In previous campaigns, marketers of the Spanish eastern coast headed to Andalusia to acquire quality late oranges to be able to supply their clients. By contrast, this season, with the low prices and demand, those same operators are backing down, waiting for prices to improve before resuming their operations. 
 
 
For more information please visit http://bit.ly/1obOImy 
 
Courtesy of Fresh Plaza

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